English : Courses

ENG 101 Writing 1

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): Fall, Spring, Summer
Requisites: Placement determined by SAT and/or ACT score
Grading: Graded (A-F)
First semester of the General Education Writing Skills Requirement for students required to take both ENG 101 and ENG 201. Practice in developing essays with variable emphases on purpose, subject, audience, and persuasion; in constructing mature sentences and paragraphs; and in revising. Introduces documenting and writing from sources. Twenty-five pages of graded, revised writing, excluding first drafts, exercises, and quizzes. Students may not receive credit for both ENG 101 and ESL 407. This course is a controlled enrollment (impacted) course. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade other than W may repeat the course in the summer or only in the fall or spring semester with a petition to the College of Arts and Sciences Deans' Office.

ENG 193 Fundamentals of Journalism

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Introduction to journalism that uses Buffalo as a backdrop to finding news and topics for feature stories. Course includes practice in the basic techniques of journalism, including finding and producing a print and broadcast news story on deadline, thinking in relation to the screen, and packaging stories for the web and broadcast media. For example: A. Galarneau This course will teach you to think, act and write like a journalist. The course is a gateway into the Journalism Certificate program and will provide an introduction to the basic principles of research, reporting and writing for print, broadcast and the web. We will cover essential reporting tools (researching, interviewing, observing) and learn to write hard news stories, short features, blogs, TV broadcasts and reported opinion pieces. You may even write the same story for three different mediums. By the end of the semester, you will be able to produce a news story on deadline for print or web and develop news feature ideas and report and write them competently. If a big story breaks, prepare to cover it. In the classroom, in addition to lectures, presentations, discussions and assignment reviews, students will do writing exercises, lots of writing exercises. Outside the classroom, students will cover assignments in the city. To be a good reporter you have to be informed about what's happening in the world around you. For this class, you have to read The New York Times and Buffalo News every day.

ENG 201 Writing 2

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): Fall, Spring, Summer
Pre-requisites: ENG 101 or placement determined by SAT and/or ACT score
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Practice in developing complex interpretations of human experience and values as represented in various media. Conceptualizing and conducting original research, culminating in a major research essay using both library and online materials.

ENG 202 Advanced Writing: Technical

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Specialized styles of writing including technical, academic, journalistic, and scientific writing. This course is designed to prepare you for the practical and technical activities you will encounter in the workplace or in other courses.

ENG 207 Introduction to Writing Poetry and Prose Fiction

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Pre-requisites: Freshman And Sophomore Standing Only. Seats reserved for juniors and seniors (available upon request from English Undergraduate Office)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of the fundamental vocabulary and techniques of the craft of writing poetry and fiction. Under consideration: issues of form, metrics, imagery, lyricism, narrative, voice, style, character, plot, and metaphor. Includes study of diverse writers and styles. Prerequisite for all subsequent creative writing courses. Basic techniques of poetry and fiction writing. For example: J. Bowen Vladimir Nabokov once reflected that ?a writer should have the precision of a poet and the imagination of a scientist.? This introductory course is designed for beginning writers who would like to take the first steps towards exploring the craft of poetry and fiction. Students will be introduced to the fundamental vocabulary and techniques of each genre. Throughout the semester, the class will also be presented with diverse readings to study and emulate in order to kindle your own imaginative strategies. No prior writing experience is necessary. We will study differing modes of narration (the benefits of using a 1st- or 3rd-person narrator, or how an unreliable narrator is useful in the creation of plot), character development ( ?round? and ?flat? characters), narrative voice (creating ?tone? and ?mood? through description and exposition), and ?minimal? and ?maximal? plot developments. In poetry, we will consider the differences between closed and open forms, the use of sound and rhythm, and uses of figurative language and imagery. We will also study prosody and the practice of the line. Assigned exercises will give you the space to experiment with unfamiliar forms. Students are also invited to meet visiting poets and fiction writers at Poetics Plus and Exhibit X readings on campus and in downtown Buffalo. It may come as no surprise that Nabokov also noted that he has ?rewritten?often several times?every word I have ever published.? This introductory course is designed to be the first step on the long journey of literary practice.

ENG 214 Top Ten Books

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The top ten books recommended in an annual survey of the University at Buffalo faculty as reading without which no undergraduate should have finished her or his education. This course serves as a basic introduction to general education.

ENG 221 World Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Selected key texts of world literature in English or in translation. For example: Prof. W. Hakala, Romance Traditions in Asia This course introduces students to narratives of romance that span Asia?s wide variety of religious, literary, theatrical, and cinematic traditions. Rather than defining romance by what it contains, we will instead consider what romance as a genre does. Through this approach, it becomes possible to examine why certain narratives were compelling enough to be transmitted across and preserved within a diverse range of cultures and historical periods. ?Texts? include English translations of Sanskrit drama, Persian and Hindi Sufi mystical works, early Japanese and Chinese novels, recent Bollywood cinema, Korean television melodramas, and the worldwide Harlequin Romance phenomenon. For example: Prof. J. Holstun, Non- North American Fiction We?ll read a diverse group of novels and novellas from South America, Europe, Africa, and Asia, including And the Rain My Drink, Han Suyin?s historical novel about the Malay Insurgency against British rule, and its defeat; The Posthumous Memoirs of Bras Cubas, Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis?s modernist autobiography of a dead man; and Hadji Murat, Lev Tolstoy?s short novel about a Muslim Chechen warlord.

ENG 223 Medieval Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Introduction to literary texts from a variety of medieval European traditions and genres. For example, Prof. J. Frakes, Medieval European Women?s Literature This course will explore the medieval European literature of women?primarily literature by women, but also some texts written by men about women or to a woman. The texts span the period from the early Middle Ages to the seventeenth century, including texts from French, German, Italian, Greek, Yiddish, and the ever present Latin [all in translation], illustrating the broad scope of genres of the time, including love poetry, epic, letters, dramas, theology, biography, and romantic-erotic fables. Among the functions of the course will be to redirect critical attention away from the [almost exclusively male] canon of medieval texts and toward texts written by women, so that some insight may be gained into problems of literary reception and production on the part of women, of the role of women in literate society, and their informing activities in religious movements, and to gain some perspective on the history of women?s literature in Europe as it is relevant to contemporary issues in gender studies.

ENG 225 Medieval English Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Literary and cultural studies of texts in Middle English and in translation. For example: Prof. R.P. Schiff: Pre-Modern British Literature This course will be a literary historical survey of medieval Britain, moving us from the Old English period (Beowulf and more) to the late-medieval era (featuring Chaucer?s Canterbury Tales). While our course readings will be restricted to texts in English (with some exceptions being works in the original Middle English), our exploration of the multilingual history of Britain will lead us to work with translations of texts from Old English (The Wanderer; The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle); Latin (Bede; Geoffrey of Monmouth); French (Marie de France; John de Mandeville); and Welsh (the Mabinogion). Our course will engage with key monuments of Arthurian literature (such as Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; Malory); political poems and documents (Piers Plowman; rebel letters); works of female mysticism (Margery Kempe); a medieval play (Mankind); and more.

ENG 231 British Writers I

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Literature of Britain and Ireland, from the beginnings to the late eighteenth century. For example: Prof. R.P. Schiff, A History of British Literature, Beginnings to 1800 This course will involve a survey of works of literature from the medieval period to the close of the eighteenth century, proceeding from Britain?s Old English period to the Anglo-Norman, the Late Medieval, the Early Modern, and the Eighteenth Century periods. While we will address the permeability of these literary historical borderlines, we will also use them as a framework for situating works in their socio-cultural contexts. Our course will imagine a rather than the literary history, and the choices in authors and excerpts will cover a number of recurring issues, such as ethnic identity conflicts, gender conventions, social and economic crises, political subversion, sexuality and knowledge, and the poetics of power. We will explore Anglo-Saxon elegies and the epic Beowulf, Marie de France?s Lanval, explore Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and investigate works by Chaucer, Shakespeare, Marlowe, Donne, Behn, Swift, and others. For example: Nicholas Hoffman, Virtue in Early British Literature This course surveys British authors from the first thousand years of British Literature, organized loosely around the rise and fall of notions of virtue (which could include holiness, right action, manliness, and uprightness) as an animating and imaginative force intimately connected with literary pursuits. The goal of this course is to achieve a better understanding of the material, cultural, religious, and political conditions of textual production among the major literary 'periods' associated with British Literature. Along the way, we will test a simple thesis: notions of virtue that animate literary works appear to peak during the Renaissance, only to suffer a precipitous decline. According to the historian and scholar Quentin Skinner, "the swaggering figure of the Renaissance gentleman continued to be held up as an ideal... at least until the end of sixteenth century," only to be "largely swept away" by the middle of the seventeenth century. In this course we will trace to development of notions of virtue from their theological underpinnings in Chaucer and other medieval works, to the retreat of virtue to imaginative literature in Sidney and Spenser, and transformation of virtue into a discourse of interest and preservation in Shakespeare, Marlowe, and Donne. We will finish by looking forward to the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, the emergence of secular humanism, and the rise of the individual.

ENG 232 British Writers II

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Literature of Britain and Ireland, from the late eighteenth century to the present. For example: Prof. R. Ablow, The Value of Literature At the beginning of the 19th century the poets William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge attempted to redefine literary value in terms of the ability of some people (poets) to communicate their feelings to other people (readers). In so doing, they began a new tradition of questioning the nature of literary value, the work of the writer, and the importance of reading literature. This course offers an introduction to the wide variety of ways in which British writers asked these questions in the 19th and 20th centuries ? and to the assumptions and concerns about society, the family, the nation, and modernity that informed and complicated the ways in which they answered them. For example: K. Fetter, Form, Genre, History We now know that nineteenth century England saw the publication of as many as, if not more than, 60,000 novels. The period we will be confronting is one in which history was in overdrive: the French Revolution, two major English Reform Bills, the Industrial Revolution, the breakdown of class structures and gender relations, the rise of Darwinian evolution, new theories of sociology, psychology, philosophy, and two world wars. However, beginning in the nineteenth century, we also have a proliferation of literature and literary genres: Romanticism, the historical novel, the Lake Poets, realism, the silver-fork novel, the Pre-Raphaelites, the sensation novel, the detective story, modernism, and postmodernism. This semester we will be turning to novels, poems, and criticism to investigate the intersections of literary genre, form, and history, as well as the complex web of relations between history, author, text, and reader that underlie our confrontations with the literary text. Why is Jane Austen considered to be the founder of the realist novel? How do the protagonists in her novels differ from those of Charles Dickens, or Virginia Woolf? What does poetry do according to Wordsworth? Tennyson? T.S. Eliot? What is a `sensation novel?? What accounts for the revolution in literary form during the first half of the twentieth century? And what role do you as reader/critic play at the intersection of all these competing possible areas of attention?

ENG 241 American Writers I

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Literature of the United States, from colonial contact to the Civil War. For example: Prof. K. Dauber, The New World and the Meaning of America This course will follow the trajectory of the literature as it works to come to terms with experience in the new world and as it broods over the meaning of being American, the truth-value of literature, and the opportunities and perils of democratic writing. Writers will include Benjamin Franklin (inventor of the "autobiography"), Cooper (inventor of the Western), Poe (inventor of the mystery story), Stowe (author of perhaps the most influential political novel every written), and such giants as Emerson, Hawthorne, and Melville. For example: C. Coley, Democracy and the Individual From Tom Paine?s revolutionary call for ?Common Sense? to Emerson?s reformist principle of ?Self-Reliance,? American writers have long attempted to reconcile those democratic ideals that uphold the freedom of the community (such as equality, national security, national welfare) with those that provide the individual freedom from the community (civil rights, privacy laws, private property). This course will explore the early American literary tradition from the colonial period to the Civil War by studying those authors, texts, and literary genres that have most thoroughly examined this often-conflicting relation between the individual and the national community. By the end of the semester, you will have a good understanding of the major literary, political, and cultural debates that preoccupied the American literary tradition from the 17th to the mid-19th century, as well as how literature as a cultural practice helped to influence these debates, beginning with the Puritas and proceeding through Franklin, Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, and Rebecca Harding Davis, among other authors. For example: A. Siehnel, The American Frontier Nationalistic narratives are common to our understanding of the United States, yet the birth and early growth of the nation hardly resulted in an increased unification among American communities. Instead, division was sustained in national practice up until the formal split of the union caused by the Montgomery Convention, just one hundred years after the American Revolution. Through reading early American letters and literature, this course surveys how constitutional differences might be linked by analyzing our understanding of settling and settled American landscapes. We will focus on how new experiences of America?s frontier are recorded by a variety of different people (including Euro-American, Native American, and enslaved American writers), and we will consider the ways in which ideas of frontier inspire fear or curiosity. Additionally, we will reflect on literary forms and genres, including the travel narrative, the slave narrative, the essay, the short story, the novel, and the poem.

ENG 242 American Writers II

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Literature of the United States, from Reconstruction to the present. For example: Prof. R. Daly, The American Novel Why read literature? What?s in it for us? How does it contribute to our ability to survive and thrive in the larger world that includes literature but is not limited to it. This course will explore 20th- and 21st-century American literature, particularly novels and short stories, by Edith Wharton, Willa Cather, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Thomas Pynchon, and Toni Morrison, among others. We shall explore how to read literature and life in detail and in context. For example: Prof. N. Schmitz, ?Lost Cause? Narratives This course begins with lost cause narratives in modern American literature. Our first lost cause is Confederate and we have to go to Mississippi to find its classic utterance. What is the Confederate South? Does it still exist? The Outlaw Josie Wales is a masterpiece of post-Confederate lost cause narrative. We go twice to Wounded Knee in this course: the last glimmer of Lakota resistance is extinguished at this site. Its principal leaders, Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull, are both assassinated while in captivity. What relation does lost cause narrative have to captivity narrative? Next we read redemptive narratives from African American literature: Martin Luther King gives a black Southern Baptist version of our national anthem, ?My country tis of thee,? and Toni Morrison?s Beloved understands its tribute. We end on the upbeat with the jolt and jive of Spike Lee?s brilliant Do The Right Thing. For example: N. Mugavero, The Purpose of Literature This course will explore authors from the Realists to the Modernists, to the Postmodernists to the (always) unnameable present, reading poetry, novels, short stories and criticism, always with an eye toward deciphering not only the meaning of this thing we call ?literature?, but also bearing in mind the historical and sociocultural factors that carry literature from the past to the present and into the future. We will attempt to unearth from this vast period of literary innovation what exactly literature has to say about the world as it once was, as it is now, and even perhaps, how it might be. In addition to the ?big picture?, we will cover a number of more specific themes at work in the various texts we will be looking at throughout the semester?such as gender, race, sexuality, femininity, masculinity, tragedy, comedy, and irony, all of which works in this period are trying to understand, rethink, and in some cases transcend.

ENG 251 Short Fiction

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Introduction to the study of what short fiction does, how it does it, and what it can do that no other literary genre can. For example: Prof. D. Schmid, ?Short Story as Cultural Artifact? This course will introduce you to the genre of short fiction. We will read a large number of authors from a wide variety of countries writing about an extraordinary array of different subjects. Throughout, our discussions will have a dual focus. We will be attentive to the formal characteristics of the short story, such as character development, plotting, and point of view, but we will also examine what these stories have to tell us about the cultures that produce them. By the end of the semester, I hope that we will all have a better understanding of what short fiction does, how it does it, and what it can do that no other literary genre can. For example: Prof. N. Schmitz, Conversations in American Short Fiction This course begins with a Poe sequence, with ?nevermore? and immurement, then it turns to Melville?s ?Bartleby,? to that famous utterance: ?I?d prefer not to,? and another immurement. We then take a comedy break, looking at some Charlie Chaplin, W. C. Fields, Laurel and Hardy, Buster Keaton, and other short films from the Golden Age of American film comedy. The next writers are also in a conversation with each other and with similar issues: we will read Charles Chesnutt?s tales in relation to Joel Chandler Harris?s Uncle Remus tales, especially ?How Brer Rabbit met Tar Baby,? a `folk tale? we are still pondering. Then we read Charlotte Perkins Gilman?s appalling The Yellow Wallpaper. Have we met this woman before, in Chesnutt?s Uncle Julius stories? Another comedy break takes us to classic TV comedy from its Golden Age, Jackie Gleason, Lucille Ball. How do we get from the woman in the wallpaper to Lucy Ricardo?

ENG 252 Poetry

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Introduction to the forms, language, and history of poetry and to methods of poetic interpretation. For example: Prof. M.Q. Ma, Anglophone Poetry: Form and Genre This course introduces students to the study of the formal and the generic features of lyric poetry in English as it develops through history. Among the issues we will study in this class are, for example, 1) what are the main types of meters (e.g., syllabic, accentual-syllabic); 2) what are the most popular metric lines (e.g., iambic pentameter) and how to scan them; 3) how to recognize particular forms (e.g., sonnet, blank verse) and genre (e.g., ballad, elegy); 4) how style changes from one historical period to another; 5) how poems are related to social, political, and cultural environments in which they are created and received; 6) how aesthetic judgments are made and how they change over time---about poets, poetics, poetry schools, poetic styles, and about poetry in general; 7) how language is used and understood as the medium. The goals of the class are, among others, to help students improve their language awareness, their ability to read poems with recognition, understanding, and appreciation, their awareness of the historical, social, cultural, and political contexts in which poems are written, and their communication skills through the study of a set of literary terms. For example: Prof. T. Dean, The Mechanics of Poetry William Carlos Williams said that poems are machines made out of words. This course introduces students to the mechanics of poetry: how poems are made, how they function, and how we talk about them at the college level. We will consider the full range of poetic forms in English from the sixteenth century to the present, focusing on how poems speak to other poems more than they speak to their authors? experience. For example: S. McCaffery, Poetry?s Function, Form, and Difference This course is designed to introduce students to the mechanics and forms of poetry: its four defined historic functions (to imitate, to teach, to express, to invent), its different partitions (genres) and how and why it differs from prose. We will consider a wide range of forms from the sixteenth century to the present and learn to analyze the structure of poems in detail. The range of texts will include, among others, the sonnet, ode, elegy, pastoral and the more recent examples of concrete and sound poetry. The goals of the class are, among others, to assist students improve their reading skills, engage in class dynamic, compare and analyze texts in both their formal and historical contexts, and develop their communication skills in both written and oral form.

ENG 253 Novel

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Introduction to the study of the novel. For example: Prof. R. Mack: The Novel?s Evidence In Gary Shteyngart?s Super Sad True Love Story (2011), characters tell their stories through diary entries and a ?GlobalTeens? account (which has elements of email, instant messaging, and, of course, Facebook). The technology may be up to date, but it is no new thing for a novel to borrow from other, apparently nonfictional, forms of writing. In this course, we focus broadly on the history of the novel in Britain and America: How did this new form of writing emerge? How has it changed over the centuries? We?ll get a hold on these big questions by looking at the novel?s use of evidence and its ideas about truth. The earliest novels are concerned to help readers see that their fictional claims might be close to fact. Daniel Defoe?s Robinson Crusoe (1719) is made up in part of Crusoe?s journal; Samuel Richardson?s Pamela (1740) is told in a series of letters. We?ll look at how these early ideas of fact and fiction are transformed, as the novel is transformed, in the centuries that follow. How does the novel use evidence to tell the truth of inner lives? How does the novel present evidence of the supernatural? How does it incorporate history? For example: Rae Muhlstock, Definitions of the Novel Virginia Woolf defines the novel as ?the most pliable of all forms.? From its very beginnings, the novel has been a genre defined by change; in its very name is its ability to redefine itself, to reinvent itself in a new?in a novel?form. Rather than attempt a definition of ?the novel,? this course will seek to explore how it encompasses such flexibility and variety. We will begin the semester with excerpts from the two authors most commonly credited with the invention of the modern novel, then moving to to the popular 18th-century travel genre and the Victorian middle class realist transformation of the travel narrative?s sense of defamiliarization. The second half of the semester includes works that question the realist techniques in place before the 20th century. These texts will raise questions about narrators, narration, and reliability. We will explore the tension between high and low cultures in the modernist and postmodern movements, and discuss how these anxieties play out on the page. Readings may include works such as Daniel Defoe?s Robinson Crusoe, Jane Austen?s Northanger Abbey, and Henry James?s Turn of the Screw.

ENG 254 Science Fiction

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
A survey of some of the major moments in the evolution of science fiction, including writers like Clarke, Delany, Le Guin, and Verne and such movies as 2001: A Space Odyssey and Blade Runner. For example: S. Ruszczycky, Frankenstein and the Genre of Science Fiction Samuel Delany claims that to identify Frankenstein as the novel that started science fiction is a misguided attempt to apologize for its popularity outside the academy by giving it a classy, literary parent. Instead, Delany suggests, we should think less about heritage and more about what traits science fiction works have in common: Androids, aliens, and mutant hybrids may not have a mother, but they have each other. At the heart of the debate over Shelley?s novel lies the broader question of literary genres: that is, how and why do writers, readers, and scholars group literary works into different categories? Science fiction, as a genre, tends to reflect thematic concerns with the problems of belonging and community: that is, how and why do we draw the line between insider and outsider, friend and enemy, human and monster, and what are the social and political stakes of these categorizations? While the problem of community isn?t by any means unique to science fiction, authors find in the genre a repertoire of tropes and conventions capable of exploring such problems in ways unavailable to other literary types. Close attention to how authors make use of this repertoire will help us elaborate a critical description of science fiction as a genre. Our work will consist primarily of close, careful readings of a number of novels and short stories, but we will also spend some time investigating the historical and cultural contexts in which these works were produced. For example: Guy Witzel, Science Fiction in the 21st Century This course examines science fiction from its origins to the age of globalization. Since its beginnings, this dynamic genre has entertained us and challenged us with visions of the future, both utopian and terrifying. Today, a decade into the 21st century, many advances have come to pass that have made their vivid first appearances in the annals of science fiction. And yet it is also the case that our world has come to share traits with this genre that are not so favorable, aspects made famous in the nightmare futures of George Orwell, Anthony Burgess, Philip K. Dick, and H.G. Wells, What, then, does science fiction have to offer us today? Through a variety of materials we shall discover a rich, socially engaged, and global genre that has shaped itself to accommodate our increasingly interconnected and imperiled planet.

ENG 256 Film

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Introduces the study of film. For example: Prof. A. Spiegel, Great Directors A study in authorship, the director as sole owner and proprietor of his material, using some of the world's great filmmakers as exam-ples: Ford, Hitchcock, Fellini, Kurosawa, and Welles. I plan for two films per director - one early, one late - to show developments in concept and style. We'll be looking at a handful of the greatest films ever made: The Seven Samurai, 8 1/2, Psycho, The Searchers, Citizen Kane, and more. In addition to the above, students will get a lot of practice in reading movies seriously (that is, closely); in writing about them; in translating images into words. For example: K. James, American and European Film History This course surveys the history of the motion picture, from its invention in the late 19th century to the present, with a focus on the development of the language of cinema over the course of the 20th century. As a result of this focus, while the course will be nominally international in scope, emphasis will be placed on American and European cinema, where much early innovation in film art occurred. And while we will primarily examine fiction film, we will also dip into documentary and experimental film, each of which genre has its own history of innovation?each from a number of angles: aesthetic (narrative form, theories of editing, genre), technological (the development of protable cameras, sound, color, digital technology), and social (the studio system, state-sponsored cinema, cinema on the margins of the industry, cinema and race/class/gender). Through a combination of screenings, critical readings, papers, and in-class discussion, we will improve our critical viewing skills and learn to ?think like filmmakers? as we engage with this quintessentially 20th-century art form.

ENG 258 Mysteries

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of a selection of the most important examples of mystery writing and of recent attempts to modernize the genre, with attention to how these novels and short stories provide miniature social histories of the periods in which they were written.? For example: Prof. D. Schmid, Mystery Novel as Cultural Artifact For decades, mystery novels have been dismissed as "potboilers," not worthy of serious critical attention. Whatever one may think of the literary merits of mysteries, there is no denying the fact that they have proved to be a remarkably resilient and diverse form of popular fiction. This course will survey a selection of both the most important examples of mystery writing and recent attempts to "update" the genre. Our focus will be on the narrative techniques used by these writers to create character, structure plot, and maintain suspense. We can tell a lot about a society from the way it discusses crime and punishment. Therefore, we will also study how these novels and short stories provide miniature social histories of the periods in which they were written.

ENG 259 Drama

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Introduction to the study of drama. For example: C. Pfahl, The Absurd What can a plague that turns people into rhinoceroses or a brothel that sells illusions tell us about what it means to be social beings? Are we all simply actors in a theater of life? This course will explore the development of the ?absurd? in dramatic literature, beginning in ancient Greece and ending in the late twentieth century. Along the way, we will encounter writers from England, Ireland, France, America, Italy, and Romania. The idea of the absurd arises in both ?comedic? and ?serious? plays, and many texts the difference between the two. We will also encounter a range of topics and themes, including revolution, romance, cross-dressing, illusion/appearance vs. reality, sexuality, carnival, and futile waiting. We will be engaging with these plays as written texts and as filmed performances or film adaptations. Students will be required to attend and review a live performance of their choosing. Finally, this class will provide an introduction to the basic elements of plays and dramatic conventions, and guidance in writing about drama. In addition to the plays, therefore, there will be some shorter supplementary critical and instructive readings. For example: R. Hatch, Dramatic Literature of the World This course offers an introduction to the world of dramatic literature, beginning in ancient Greece and finishing in the U.S. in 2001; along the way we will stop in Japan, France, Ireland, England, and Norway, studying a wide range of forms, among them tragedy, comedy, melodrama, and expressionism. We?ll encounter plays-within-plays and plays about performance; ?epic? plays and plays that appear to be about nothing at all. The basic fact that a play requires, at minimum, a group of readers reading together suggests that no other form of writing is better suited to the classroom than drama. Keeping in mind that drama is both a literary and performing art, we?ll study each play on our list both as a textual artifact and as a blueprint for action (a script), exploring the history of its performance and reception. We will discover echoes of this duality at work in each play we read, as a tension between the ?show-stopping? potential of images and the incessant movement of plot, which unfreezes and undermines the image. Each treats this tension differently; we?ll make it our business to discover what these differences mean for us.

ENG 263 Environmentalist Writings

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Environmentalist writing, from nineteenth-century texts like Thoreau?s Walden through contemporary essays, fiction, and poetry. For example: Prof. C. Mardorossian, Ecocriticism What counts as the environment has radically changed over the last few decades. Whereas once our urban contexts were seen as antithetical to natural environments, today the urban environment constitutes one of the most studied aspects of environmental literature. In this course, we will look at the ways in which this development has affected ecocriticism, that is, ?the study of the relationship between literature and the physical environment.? We will be using the Green Studies Reader to review the various approaches that have defined environmental literature since the Romantics (from nature writing to service ecology, from deep ecology to cyborg theory) and discuss the legacies of the 2006 documentary An Inconvenient Truth. In addition, we will read literary narratives in light of each approach promoted by the nonfiction writings we survey. For example: M. Konkol, Ecopoetics and Econarratology In this course we will, as Olson hoped, ?discover ourselves? as members of a global transnational biotic community. We will do this by reading poems, narratives, philosophical and scientific tracts. By alternating our reading between more conventionally recognized ?ecocritical? texts and material which is typically considered far removed from environmental concerns (experimental poetry and metropolitan postmodern fiction), we will arrive at compelling claims for literature?s role in plotting an ecologically sustainable future. Among the questions we will ask are: is art a form of recycling? What is natural and what is artificial? How do different narrative strategies make possible different attitudes towards the environment? How do we or might we read literature ecologically? Are there ways of reading which are, at some level, more in tune with ecology and the environment than other ways? This course will progress thematically but we will be mindful of our own pivotal historical moment as the culmination of a long history of differing attitudes toward the environment.

ENG 264 Children's Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of selected texts from the vast variety that comprises children?s literature, ranging from seventeenth-century fairy tales to contemporary children?s fiction. Trains students to analyze and write about the relationship between literary texts and the culture within which these texts are produced. For example: S. Brockman, Homecoming in Children?s Literature During a whirlwind adventure that begins in a cyclone and takes her all the way through Oz, Dorothy realizes that ?There?s no place like home.? When he learns that he?s a wizard, Harry Potter and finds his true home at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Many classic and contemporary works of children?s literature revolve around themes of escape and homecoming. In this course, we?ll think about why children?s literature lends itself so well to these and other important literary themes, drawing us in, often with more intensity than other sorts of literature. Above all, we?ll consider works of children?s literature as literature. In addition to doing close readings of various texts, we will consider them within their specific historical contexts and changing social climates. Texts for this course will cross centuries and continents and include multiple genres, with an emphasis on prose fiction and film adaptations. For example: Prof. L. Bendict, Sexuality, Pedagogy, and Censorship in Children?s Literature In 2007, Susan Patron?s The Higher Power of Lucky won the Newberry Medal. This uplifting little story might have happily existed on children?s library shelves across the US had the award not led to its acclaim, and therefore heightened scrutiny. Instead, the extra attention it received raised a moral hue and cry due to the appearance of the word ?scrotum? on the first page of the book. The reaction to Patron?s work raises many questions about the pedagogical aspect of children?s literature: if a book for children has the responsibility to teach, then where do we place the limit to knowledge? In this course, we will examine the tenuous line between childhood and adulthood by way of a broad survey of children?s literature, paying close attention to the relationships between pedagogy, morality, gender, and sexuality. This course will start in the 18th century with instructive stories for young people, proceed to the 19th-century mathematical fiction written to distract young boys from ?self-abuse,? and end in the 20th century, where the new genre of young adult fiction describes the child?s traumatic passage into adulthood. Along the way we will analyze the changing definitions of ?child,? including the kinds of knowledge children should or should not have, and the types of experience they should or should not be allowed to access.

ENG 268 Irish Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Introduction to Irish writing and culture. For example: Prof. D. Keane, The People of Ireland This course introduces the study of Irish literature in the twentieth century, focusing on constructions of notions of ?the people.? Beginning with the writing of the Literary Revival, we will track how changes in Irish society were both complicated and simplified by literary figures. As a unified and unitary sense of the ?Irish people? was argued about and, at times, fought over in the political sphere, how did writers add their voices to these debates? How did they respond to the challenges posed by women?s suffrage and feminism; the dwindling and impoverished population of Irish speakers on the island; differentiating the Irish from their British neighbors; migrations to urban centers in a predominantly agricultural and rural society; high rates of emigration; an island partitioned into a twenty-six county south and a six-county north; and the bitter legacy of Ireland?s struggles for self-determination? To attend to these questions, we will examine the public transmission of information, whether as representations of rumor, gossip, or chatter; the production of literary texts as politically-motivated and even propagandistic statements meant to spur debate and change public opinion; and the reception of such works in troubled and frequently violent contexts. For example: Ronan Crowley, 20th Century Irish Literature This course offers an introduction to the literature of twentieth century Ireland. We will explore a range of narrative forms ? short stories, poetry, drama, and the novel ? in the context of Irish history and culture and range as far as the newspaper column, a format not usually associated with the literary. Early in the semester we will read key literary figures including William Butler Yeats, James Joyce, George Moore, and Sean O?Casey. Turning to such post-independence writers as Elizabeth Bowen and Una Troy, subsequent readings will be drawn from the writings for page, stage and newspaper of Samuel Beckett, John Montagues, Patrick McCabe, and Brian O?Nolan.

ENG 270 Asian American Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Introduction to selected Asian American literary texts and the cultural, historical, and political issues that inform them. For example: Prof. S. Moynihan, Diversity of Asian America This course provides a general introduction to Asian American literature. ?Asian America,? as a pan-ethnic coalition born in response to racism and Orientalism, has been the site of tremendous literary production. The texts we will explore represent issues as diverse as the Japanese American internment during World War II; the traumatic legacy of colonialism for Korean Americans; the ironies marking the young lives of Vietnamese refugees from ?Operation Babylift? and Cambodian refugees resettled in the United States; the historical effects of migrant labor and colonialism on Filipino Americans; and the tensions around assimilation for those of Chinese and South Asian descent. Contemporary anxieties of race, gender, and sexuality will come to the fore in the work of a graphic novel. We will ask how Asian American writers respond to the politics of race and American imaginings of Asia, and how the literary texts register this response in terms of genre, narrative structure, character construction, and style.

ENG 271 African American Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Introduction to the study of African American Literature, with focus on major writers such as Frederick Douglass, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston and Toni Morrison. For example: Prof. H. Young, Contemporary African American Literature and Culture This class introduces students to contemporary African American literature, looking at the diversity of literary production that falls under the category of ?black.? What does it mean to be black and how does the literature we read explode any preconceptions we might have about its various meanings in different locations and time periods? Attention will be paid to topics such as immigration, sexuality, gender and slavery. In addition to novels and graphic novels, the class will include critical analyses of popular culture such as hip-hop, music videos and blogs. Many of the topics can become controversial but the classroom will be a safe place to work through some of the messiness of race and gender. For example: D. Squires, The Black American Autobiography Perhaps the most vital genre in black American literature, autobiography has been central to understanding the development of American history and African American autobiography is central to this understanding. Key historical figures such as Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson offered personal accounts of America?s foundation. Instead of starting with the founding fathers, however, we?ll begin in the cotton field on a journey that will take us all the way to the White House. Starting with texts written by former slaves (Douglass, Jacobs, Wells), this course will explore American life before and after the Civil War, and into the 20th century. Ida B. Wells and Richard Wright provide formidable accounts of segregated America. We will then turn to stories about civil rights movements and the struggle to desegregate the U.S. (Haley, Moody, Angelou). We?ll tackle questions about sex in the aftermath of the rights movements with Audre Lorde and we?ll ask what exactly Barack Obama, and America more generally, has inherited from this exemplary tradition of American autobiography.

ENG 272 US Latino/a Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Introduction to the variety of cultural works produced by U.S. Latino/a writers and artists, from poetry and plays to novels and films. For example: Prof. C. Tirado-Bramen, Latino and Latina Cultural Expression From poetry and performance art to novels and short stories, this course will provide an overview of cultural works produced by U.S. Latino and Latina writers and artists. We will begin with a historical perspective and the importance of the Mexican American War of 1848 and the Spanish American War of 1898 in forging a U.S. Latino presence in the United States, then turn turn to early twentieth-century immigrant journalists, such as Bernardo Vega and Jes?s Col?n, viewing their early works alongside Mexican corridos (ballads) from Texas. We will then explore the 1950s, comparing the zoot suit poetry of Ra?l Salinas with Piri Thomas?s Nuyorican novel Down These Mean Streets. We will read sidely in the Nuyorican and Chicano Renaissance of the late 1960s and 1970s, examining the nationalist ideologies of Aztl?n and Boricua and the early critiques of Latina feminists. We?ll then turn to the rise of a pan-Latino identity in the 1980s and 1990s. There will be a slide show of contemporary mural art, a screening of performance pieces by Coco Fusco as well as the movie ?El Norte.?

ENG 273 Women Writers

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Introduction to literature written by women, with focus on historical and cultural context of women?s lives. For example: Prof. S. Moynihan, America and Americanness in Women?s Literature This course will provide an introduction to the study of literature by women and to the significance of gender in literary analysis. In our readings, we will consider themes that often resurface in women?s literature, such as body image, women?s work and constructions of domesticity, reproduction and motherhood, women?s culture, and issues of agency and voice. Is there a particular aesthetic associated with femininity? How does gender intersect with other forms of difference (racial, sexual, class-based)? Do the differences among women allow for connection or solidarity, both in terms of feminist politics and in terms of literary critique? How have women?s social, political, and economic positions affected literary production? How has women?s literature enacted social and political critique? In what ways has women?s literature re-envisioned history? How have women drawn upon and yet revised cultural traditions? What is the relationship between women?s literature and the literary canon? Focus will be on American women?s literature, particularly texts that engage ideas of Americanness. For example: H. Recny, A Literature of One?s Own How does women?s writing distinguish itself from its male counterparts? Are there common themes that appear in writing by women? Can they be ?universal?? How do women represent (other) women? How have women writers and the characters that they represent grappled with the exclusions and inequalities among women? How are you connected to women in the United Kingdom, Antigua, India, and Zimbabwe? This course focuses on how gender influences the writing of a particular time and place. Using canonical and non-canonical texts, we will explore how non-western women writers from the colonies and newly independent nations represent women and identities that do not fit traditional categories of gender, race, and nation. We will engage in debates about the literary canon, language ownership, the usefulness of gender as basis for a literary genre and community, and the function of writing as part of a global exchange.

ENG 274 Feminist Approaches to Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Introduction to the study of feminist theory and its applications to literary texts.

ENG 276 Literature and the Law

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Examination of works of literature that revolve around representations of the relationships between law, community, religion, and the state, with attention to the relationship between legal interpretation and textual analysis. For example: Morani Kornberg-Weiss, Language and the Law In the study and practice of law, truth and justice rely on narration. Words, after all, are essential for lawyers, defendants, and juries. Rhetoric and argumentation help one make a ?case.? This course invites students to explore the nature of law, ethics, and social justice through the prism of literature and language. We will consider the modes in which law and literature intersect and think about the function of narrative and storytelling, form and sequence, punishment, interpretation, ethics, and political and social order. Beginning with the question ?What is truth?? we will examine its ramifications in various cultural, social, and historical moments. Texts are often ambiguous and contradictory, holding multiple truths and meanings. They change as readers change. These paradoxes will motivate us to ask: in what way is law similar to literature? How does each discipline define a ?text?? How does each define ?justice?? How does literature employ narrative as a form of regulation? How does the way in which a story is told affect what it means? Although most of the texts we will read clearly foreground the function of law and punishment, others engage us through a seemingly absent legal system.

ENG 278 Best Sellers

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Examination of the phenomenon of the best seller in the past and present.

ENG 281 Special Topics

Lecture
Credits: 1-3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply. For example: Prof. D. Schmid, Intro Pop Culture Despite the fact that popular culture plays a large part in the vast majority of ordinary people?s lives, its serious study is still a relatively recent phenomenon in the academy, which has tended to dismiss pop culture as nothing more than mindless, frivolous, even pernicious entertainment. This class will explore why pop culture matters by introducing students to the basic theories and approaches to the scholarly study of popular culture, concentrating in particular on how pop culture helps to create and reflect the zeitgeist of the periods in which it emerges and evolves. We will accomplish these goals by focusing on the theme of violence in American popular culture. From the Puritan period to the present day, Americans have always documented their intense interest in violence through popular culture and we will investigate the history of and reasons for this interest by studying examples taken from a wide variety of genres and subjects. Along the way, we will discuss the distinction between folk, mass, and popular culture; changing definitions of criminality and deviance; manifest destiny; urbanization; the influence of evolving media technologies, and the rise of a celebrity culture organized around criminals, with a primary emphasis on how popular culture gives us insights into the societies of which it is an integral part. This class will be taught in a large lecture format, with small seminar groups each Friday to discuss particular texts. For example: J. Bodway, The Gothic From the success of survival horror video games (Resident Evil, Silent Hill, etc.), to the continued popularity of horror films (Halloween, Saw, etc.), it is not a stretch to say that horror is a business, and its business is good. As a business, horror is an emotion that is manufactured by the images that we see and by the stories that we read. However, these images and stories have a history, and this course will examine how this history has come to shape our understanding. Our investigation will begin with a study of the gothic novel as it emerges at the end of the eighteenth century, then move into the many gothic themes of British and American Romanticism. Gothic literature often blurs the distinction between the physical and the psychological. In addition to our readings, we will examine paintings by such artists as Henry Fuseli, Francisco de Goya, and Gustave Dor?. We will end the semester with a screening of Stanley Kubricks rendition of The Shining; a tour de force of gothic cinema.

ENG 301 Criticism

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): Fall, Spring, Summer
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Introduction to the craft of literary criticism, including techniques of close reading, two or more sorts of literary theory, and strategies for writing and revising critical papers. For example: Prof. S. Hubbard, Approaches to Literature and Culture What is literature (as opposed to all the other written material that?s out there)? What does it mean to ?close read? it? To ?interpret? it? To ?deconstruct? it? Why is one reading of a novel or a poem more persuasive, more useful, more influential than another? How can your own writing about literature plug into some of the insights and lines of inquiry that professional theorists and critics have developed? What do your professors really want when they ask you to make ?an original? argument about a literary text? In this course, you?ll discover the answers to these questions and many more. English 301 provides students of literature with an introduction to the varieties of literary and cultural criticism and the techniques and strategies required to research and write effective critical essays (the course is not, however, a general introductory survey of literature). We will discuss a number of key theoretical concepts and approaches to the analysis of literature (New Critical, poststructuralist, historicist, reader-response, feminist, psychoanalytic, Marxist, eco-critical, queer, race theory, etc.) and will read some ?classic? works of criticism and theory that have helped to shape the field. We will also consider the strategies of analysis appropriate to different genres as well as practicing methods of rhetorical and historical reading and textual analysis. For example: Prof. J. Holstun, Literary Theory and Edgar Allan Poe This course will introduce the craft of literary criticism, moving from high falutin? psychoanalytical and literary theory, to meat-and-potatoes close reading, to nuts-and-bolts research methods and revision techniques. With focus on the poetry, fiction, and critical prose of Edgar Allan Poe, we will read a wide variety of literary criticism, including formalist studies of Poe?s craftsmanship, psychoanalytical studies of the unconscious and literary form, and cultural and Marxist studies of Poe, race, and capitalism. We?ll read three Poe-esque novellas: E. T. A. Hoffmann?s ?The Sandman,? Herman Melville?s ?Benito Cereno? (about slave rebellions and white hysteria), and Charlotte Perkins Gilman?s ?The Yellow Wallpaper? (about patriarchal enclosure and domestic madness), and Freud?s ?The Uncanny? and Beyond the Pleasure Principle as ways to understand Poe?s literary effects. And we?ll talk about paper development, manuscript form, research methods (finding works online and on the shelves), using biographical and socio-cultural material creatively, and prose revision.

ENG 302 Old English

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Introduction to the language, literature, and culture of Anglo-Saxon England. For example: Prof. J. Frakes, Learning Old English Old English often has a bad reputation, as if the course itself were as dark and ghoulish as the monsters that Beowulf had to fight. Well, it doesn?t have to be like that. The bottom line is that, while Old English does require some work, it?s possible to learn and can even be quite a bit of fun, because there is a great deal of interesting material in Old English that you won?t find anywhere else and that has nothing to do with sword and ogres and dragons (though there is some of that). By consciously recognizing what you already know about English, Old English can open up a new culture to you rather than being a ?foreign language.? In this course we will spend some time on a guided review of what you already know about English so you can apply that to thousand-year old texts. Then we?ll be ready for reading Old English texts: about daily life, magic, religious practices, gender roles, burial customs, tenth-century ladies? fashions, shipwrecks, and so on.

ENG 303 Chaucer

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of works by Chaucer, including The Canterbury Tales, the dream visions, and / or Troilus and Criseyde. For example: Prof. R. Schiff, The Canterbury Tales Geoffrey Chaucer has often been called the Father of English poetry, and indeed his work has profoundly influenced both the literary canon and the very language itself. In our course we will explore the texts and contexts of Chaucer?s most seminal project, The Canterbury Tales. Besides reading Chaucer?s poetry in the original Middle English, we will also familiarize ourselves with late-medieval culture by exploring related primary and secondary texts.

ENG 304 Studies in Medieval Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Study of Medieval literature in relation to historical and cultural phenomena, including multiple genres. A. Medieval Romance. B. Medieval Prose.. For example 304A: Prof. Randy Schiff, Arthurian Literature Throughout the Middle Ages, narratives related to the world of King Arthur proved to be among the most popular literary works. This course will consist of a survey of key texts of medieval Arthurian literature, reading works (often in translation) from the Latin, Old French, and Middle English traditions. In our survey of Arthurian literature, we will look closely at issues of power that are played out in these texts, while negotiating the differences between the ?chronicle? and ?romance? styles of Arthurian literature.

ENG 305 Medieval Epic

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of the social and cultural function of epic and the hero in medieval Europe. For example: Prof. J. Frakes, Jewish Epic This course will examine the development of the Jewish Epic. In the late Middle Ages the literary genre of epic suddenly appeared in Jewish culture for the first time in its history, and it appeared in Yiddish, not Hebrew: both short heroic lays and lengthy epics, both secular tales adapted from Christian sources and religious tales derived from Jewish traditions of Bible and midrash. There are epicized versions of humorous tales of Abraham?s youth, pious meditations on core narratives of the Jewish faith (the Binding of Isaac), swashbuckling Jewish adventure heroes, King David as a quasi-medieval night, and a tale of international intellectual intrigue with a high priest, a pope, a Jewish king, a pious scholar, and a beautiful maiden.

ENG 306 Love in the Western World

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of the medieval literary origins of modern conceptions of romantic love. For example: Prof. J. Frakes, Romantic Love in Western Literature Over the course of the last two-and-a-half millennia there have developed multiple traditions of romantic love in Western Asia and Europe. This course will investigate those traditions by means of a survey of both theoretical writings concerning love and literary works that themselves represent romantic love.

ENG 308 Early Modern Drama

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
British drama from roughly 1450 to 1660, from late-medieval mystery and morality plays to the establishment of a professional theatre under Elizabeth I and its development through the Jacobean and Caroline periods. For example: Prof. B. Bono: The Illusion of Power Shakespeare?s plays were written in an age of theater that also produced a host of other major playwrights ? Marlowe, Dekker, Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher, Webster-- and literally dozens of masterful plays. Theater under Elizabeth I and James I was both elite and popular. It was orthodox, conforming religious and political pieties, exorcising social discontent, and it was subversive, threatening traditional boundaries and articulating hitherto unspoken fears. It was performed in the centers of power ? the courts, grate houses, and banqueting halls of the mighty ? and it was marginalized, censored, played out in the suburbs, amid the stews and the bear baiting. In 1642 the public theater was suppressed, but in 1649 it arguably played out its ?last act? in a process Franco Moretti has been described as the ?deconsecration of sovereignty,? the literal execution of the King Charles I. This course will study these distinctions among and contradictions within the Elizabethan and Jacobean theater through an historical survey reaching back to the native origins of English drama and looking ahead to Charles? deposition. After sampling from the antecedent English mystery plays, moralities, and humanist experiments in drama, we will frame our study through the anti-theatrical debates of the period and focus upon approximately one play a week.

ENG 309 Shakespeare, Early Plays

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Primarily histories and comedies. For example: Prof. C. Mazzio, Drama of Errors This course will focus on Shakespeare?s comedies, histories, and select tragedies. While this course will serve as an introduction to Shakespeare?s early plays, introducing students to Shakespeare?s language, dramatic technique, and innovations as he moved from play to play, we will also examine some central issues that traverse many plays and genres, including, for example, the status of error in Shakespeare. For example: Prof. A. Stott, Theatricality of the Self, Nation, and Stage This course looks exclusively at the career of William Shakespeare from the very earliest work up to his greatest masterpiece, Hamlet. We?ll begin by considering the state of the London stage at the time of Shakespeare?s debut, the social and political conditions of England at the time, and the artistic and literary precursors that influenced his work. We?ll pay attention to three principle genres in which he worked at this time?comedy, tragedy, and history?and try to trace the development of some of his key themes: desire?s conflict with convention; freedom versus duty; history and the idea of nation; and various ruminations on the theme of theatricality, especially social convention as a type of theatre, and the representation of self as a kind of performance. For example: Prof. B. Bono, Authority and Romance This Fall Semester course on Shakespeare?s earlier works will begin with his self-conscious gestures of mastery in the virtually interchangeable romantic tragedy Romeo and Juliet (1594-96) and romantic comedy A Midsummer Night?s Dream (1594-96). During the course of the semester we will then go on to read selections from his second tetralogy of history plays?Richard II (1595), 1 Henry IV (1597), and Henry V (1598-99)?and his series of romantic comedies?Twelfth Night (1599-1600)?as complementary treatments of the fashioning of authority from without, through the recreation of a myth of divine kingship, and from within, through the reproductive consent of women.

ENG 310 Shakespeare, Late Plays

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Primarily tragedies and romances. For example: Prof. B. Bono, Political (Dis)Order This course typically begins with the Chorus?s fond hope at the beginning of Act V of Henry V that the triumphant Hal will enter London like a ?conqu?ring Caesar,? or ?As, by a lower but highloving likelihood, Were now the General of our gracious Empress?/ As in good time he may?from Ireland coming, /Bringing rebellion broached on his sword.? But there?s a problem. Essex, the ambitious courtier-knight who was ?the General of our gracious Empress? did not come home from Ireland like a ?conqu?ring Caesar,? ?Bring rebellion broached on his sword.? Instead he came home defeated, rebellious himself. In the late Elizabethan regime, the fragile balance that created celebratory history plays and resolved romantic comedies?the materials of English 309: Shakespeare?s Earlier Plays?collapses, so that, with Elizabeth?s death and James?s accession, we are left with frank examinations of how political order is often created out of irrational and self-interested acts of violence (Julius Caesar), leaving skepticism (Hamlet), surveillance (Measure for Measure), excoriating sexual jealousy and doubt (Othello), heated ambition (Macbeth), and the threat of total annihilation (Lear). In Shakespeare?s final plays, the problem of political authority reorganizes itself around greater and more various agency for women and anticipations of the new world order of the Americas. Origin, conflict , sex, murder, ambition, death, production, and reproduction will be our issues. For example: Prof. S. Eilenberg, The Wit of Paradox This course is devoted to a reading of Shakespeare?s later plays, including the mass of great tragedies (Hamlet, Lear, Othello, Macbeth) and a few of the romances (The Winter?s Tale, The Tempest). All his life Shakespeare has been interested in the space of impossibility made possible: it has been the space of playful wit, flaunted theatricality, amusing or outrageous paradox. As the playwright develops this space of paradox sheds its boundaries and grows ever more uncanny. The characters of the late tragedies and romances face what cannot be faced, bear what cannot be borne-- and as one character cries to another, ?Thy life?s a miracle,? we meditate upon the tragic lie he tells that is at the same time a tragic truth. It is this disbelieved fiction of goodness--born of madness and delusion and chicanery and revenge but intimating something else, pointing mysteriously toward what King Lear calls the ?chance which does redeem all sorrows / That ever I have felt,? upon which the tragedies brood. It is this fiction too upon which the romances build their fictions of that which lies on the other side of loss, out beyond grief--not resurrection, perhaps, but that which may be just as welcome. All this will be our matter.

ENG 311 Text and Image in Early Modern Culture

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Examination of the relationship between the visual arts and the written word in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, including the impact of iconoclasm, printing and the book trade, continental influences, and classicism, together with the relationship between art and power.

ENG 312 Studies in Early Modern Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Selected topics in early modern British literature, such the literature of exploration, early modern gay and lesbian literature, literature at court, literature of religious controversy, the English Revolution, or single authors like Christopher Marlowe.

ENG 313 Sixteenth-Century Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Mostly non-dramatic literature from authors such as More, Medwall, Skelton, Wyatt, Surrey, Spenser, Philip Sidney, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Nashe, Elizabeth I, and Mary Sidney.

ENG 314 Seventeenth-Century Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Mostly non-dramatic literature from authors such as Donne, Lanyer, Jonson, Bacon, Marvell, Milton, Hobbes, Bunyan, Behn, Dryden, and the radical writers of the English Revolution. For example: S. Stevens, 17th Century Poetry and Prose This course will examine a wide variety of seventeenth-century poetry and prose. We will study such major authors as Ben Jonson, John Donne, and George Herbert as well as a number of less familiar Metaphysical and Cavalier poets. Among prose writers we will look at the important development in cultural history and prose styles represented by Francis Bacon, Thomas Browne, John Bunyan and others. All works will be read with attention to their culture and historical contexts. Issues such as the Protestant Reformation, the English Revolution, sexuality and gender, and the rise of science will be among the topics addressed in this course.

ENG 315 Milton

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of Milton?s Paradise Lost and other works in social and literary context. For example: Prof. S. Eilenberg, Poetry of Excess This course will be devoted to the study of John Milton, devoted student of power relations, a poet whose imaginative audacity and intellectual power have inspired three centuries of poets and other readers with wonder and chagrin. Milton is the premier poet of excess, a too-muchness that works, paradoxically, to convert plenitude into poverty and to subvert the possibility of measurement and comparison that reason requires. This subversion?the confusion between too much and too little--will be our theme as it was Milton?s. We shall read his major poetry and a little of his prose: Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, Areopagitica, as well as such slighter works as Comus and ?On the Morning of Christ?s Nativity.? For relief from sublimity--and in order to remember the stories that nourished the poems?we shall also be reading Ovid?s Metamorphoses. For example: Prof. Graham Hammill, Milton?s Poetic Development This course will focus on the poetry and prose of John Milton, one of the most compelling and important poets in all of English literature. The first half of the semester, we will read Milton?s early experimental poetry, his youthful efforts to redefine various Classical and Renaissance forms of poetry and drama, as well as some of his political prose. The second half of the semester, we will read Milton?s major poems, Paradise Lost, Paradise Re-gained, and Samson Agonistes. Throughout, we will pay close attention to Milton?s ambitions to become England?s greatest poet, the role of gender and sexuality in his poetry and prose, the intimate connection in his writings between religion and revolution, and his on-going attempt to define and assert liberty.

ENG 316 Early Women Writers

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Medieval Works by European women such as Hrotsvit, Heloise, Marie de France, Moderata Fonte, Veronica Franco, Justine Siegemund, and Glueckel of Hameln. B. Renaissance Works by such sixteenth- and seventeenth-century women writers as Wroth, Lanyer, Carey, Speght, Sowerman, Sidney, Cavendish, Bradstreet, Astell, and Phillips. C. Restoration and Eighteenth Century Works by writers such as Behn, Burney, Haywood, Lennox, Montague, Wollstonecraft. For example: Prof. J. Frakes, Women Writers of Medieval and Early Modern Venice Medieval and early modern Venice was a terribly exciting place economically, politically, and culturally. It had earlier been home to Marco Polo and was during the early modern period home to the composers Vivaldi and Monteverdi, the painter Titian, the architect Palladio, and to one of the most vibrant and intellectually productive Jewish communities in history. It was the international marketplace of Europe, importing goods from as far away as Japan, and controlling seaways of the entire eastern Mediterranean. Venice was also home to one of the earliest broad-ranging bodies of women?s literature in history. That literature is often overtly (proto-) feminist and just as often rivals and quality the interest produced by Renaissance men.

ENG 317 British Drama

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Selected topics in British drama from the Restoration period through the present. A. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Drama Drama from the period 1660 to 1800, including works by authors such as Behn, Congreve, Wycherley, Sheridan, Otway and Etheridge. B. Romantic Drama Drama from the period 1770 to 1830, including works by writers such as Baillie, Lewis, Inchbald, Shelley, Byron, Cowley, Coleman, Dibdin, and Kemble. C. Nineteenth-Century British Drama Drama from the period 1800 to 1914, including works by authors such as Wilde, Pinero, Shaw, Granville-Barker, Ibsen, Thomas and others. For example: Prof. D. Alff, Restoration Drama London?s playhouses had been shuttered for eighteen years when Charles II lifted the Puritan ban on public stage performance. His 1660 order to re-open the theaters triggered an outpouring of new and adapted plays from the likes of John Dryden, William Wycherley, Aphra Behn, and many others, while re-authorizing modes of cultural commentary and political expression that had been driven underground during the Interregnum. This course will familiarize students with British drama written between 1660 and 1730. We will read one play per week, giving special attention to how the London stage became a space for raising problems of class, gender, race, and national difference. Signature thematic interests of this period included differing conceptions of sex, marriage, and domesticity, the corruption of state leaders, the expansion of overseas empire, and the growing popularity of the city and its mercantile values. Our analysis will also take into the account how drama itself was changing in this period, including, most notably, the debut of women on stage. In addition to the primary literature, students will read brief excerpted works of modern performance theory to consider what experiences and knowledge our text-based ?reading? of drama might exclude.

ENG 318 Eighteenth-Century Fiction

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Fiction prior to and including the first British novels; authors may include Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Samuel Richardson, Frances Burney. For example: Prof. D. Alff, Popular Fiction of 18th Century Britain Cunning deceit. Dissimulating pretense. Imaginative invention. These are just a few eighteenth-century definitions for fiction, a term we today associate with prose stories. This course will investigate a broad range of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century English-language fictions, challenging students to refine their understanding of this popular mode of literary expression. For example: Prof. R. Mack, Origins of the English Novel This course examines how the English novel came into being. Although we now call their texts ?novels,? many of the authors we will read in this course would have considered that an insult, and instead called their books ?histories,? ?stories,? and even ?comic epic-poems in prose.? How did this motley group of texts come to be understood as evidence of the same novel, or new, thing? What did it mean to call a fictional text a ?history?? How did what Henry Fielding referred to as a new ?Species of Writing? attempt to make itself respectable? We will examine the battles waged between this new writing and the generic adversaries it created, such as poetry, the newspaper, and the romance. We will discuss the novel?s relationship to society, both as early writers saw it and as it has been understood since.

ENG 319 Eighteenth Century Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable as specified in particular course sections and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply. Poetry and prose in Britain from 1688 to the age of the French Revolution. A: Poetry, Focuses on poetry from 1700 to the 1790s; authors include Pope, Swift, Wordsworth. B: Early Gothic, Focuses on the first examples of the gothic genre in poetry, novels and prose; authors may include Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, Mary Shelley. C: Enlightenment Cultures, Consideration of the diverse cultures of the eighteenth century and the formation of the idea of culture in the period. For example 319A: Prof. D. Alff, 18th Century British Poetry What was a poem in eighteenth-century Britain? What did it do or try to do? These are the guiding questions behind this course?s survey of English verse written between 1660 and 1800. We will study poems both as self-conscious aesthetic objects possessing certain rhetorical and metrical properties, and as vehicles for public expression. Class discussion and writing assignments will stress the techniques of formal analysis, ?close reading? skills that students can use to make sense of poetic texts from any period. Keeping in mind the mutually-generative relationship between text and cultural context, we will ask why poets adapted certain poetic forms to articulate positions on contemporary issues. How does Alexander Pope?s use of heroic couplets contribute to his vanquishment of literary opponents in The Dunciad? Why does James Grainger draw upon the Virgilian tradition of georgic poetry to salute commercial productivity in the Caribbean? For example 319C: Prof. R. Mack, Culture in 18th Century Britain What is ?culture? and what does it means to study it? We?ll answer this question first by turning to the 18th century in Britain and France when the concept of culture (if not the term itself) came into being. We?ll look at the ways in which writers began to study the customs and habits of other societies and of their own societies. Our texts for doing so will be diverse. We?ll examine closely literature, travel writing, history, and philosophy. In doing so we?ll be especially concerned with the difficulties that arose when writers attempted to understand cultural differences and with the ways in which they called on different kind of writing to represent those differences. How do you distinguish between actions informed by religious belief and actions informed by habit? To what extent can you believe what you see is not clouded by your own beliefs and opinion? What are the criteria for comparing one culture to another? Writers in the eighteenth century asked these questions and it will be central to our project in the course to compare their earlier answers with later answers in anthropology and literature.

ENG 320 Romantic Movement

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
British poetry and prose written mainly between 1780 and 1832 by such writers as Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, Byron, and Wollstonecraft. For example: Prof. S. Eilenberg, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, and Keats This course will be devoted primarily to a study of William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and John Keats, four poets whose anxieties about the possibility of representation (also about the allied possibilities of likeness, of difference, of repetition, of sympathy, of redemption, and of freedom) produced some of our most provocative critical mythologies, inexplicit allegories of reading and identity. We will be reading some of their major writings, most of it poetry, a small amount of it prose.

ENG 321 Gothic Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Key texts and topics in Gothic literature from the late eighteenth century to the early twenty-first century. Issues may include history, national identity, sexuality, reproduction, spaces and bodies, and belief.

ENG 322 Victorian Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
British literature and culture from 1832 to 1901, focusing on authors such as Carlyle, Ruskin, Gaskell, Dickens, Eliot, Barrett Browning, Browning, Rossetti, Tennyson, and others. For example: Prof. R. Ablow, Victorian Literature and Contemporary Film and Television Many of the movies, television shows, and novels that are most popular today are in some way based on the literature of the Victorian period. Not only do adaptations of popular Victorian texts continue to be made (?Wuthering Heights,? ?Jane Eyre,? and ?Great Expectations? are just a few of the films that have made recently), but whole genres can be traced to the nineteenth century. The horror movie; the romantic comedy; the teen drama; the tear-jerker: all of these have precursors in the Victorian period. This course puts nineteenth-century novels, poetry, and non-fictional prose in dialogue with late twentieth- and early twenty-first century films and TV shows in order to consider what has changed and what has stayed the same. We will focus, in particular, on issues of gender, sexuality, race, and class, as well as questions about genre, rhetoric, and narrative expectation. For example: Visiting Prof. K. Brown, Victorian Literature and the Individual In this course, we will examine literary strategies by which Victorian writers sought to explore the possibility and hazards of being ?oneself?: of achieving and expressing a sense of personal uniqueness, coherence, and authenticity during a period in which social relations became increasingly impersonal and mobile. The reading will cover major writers of the period, as well as a wide range of literary forms, including essays, novels, poetry, short stories, and plays. What these texts share is a sense that traditional bases of identity no longer govern social relations. In response, they tend to ask what the nature of modern identity is: How we can know ourselves and others? Is an authentic self possible? Is it even to be desired? In class discussion and writing assignments, you will be asked to attend closely to the language, structure, and genre of a text, so that we can consider how the literary experience it affords compares to the historical or social experience it depicts.

ENG 323 Sex and Gender in the Nineteenth Century

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Examination of the central role played by gender and sexuality in the history, culture, and literature of the nineteenth century. For example: Prof. W. Hakala, Gender in South Asian Literature, Theatre, and Film This course will examine the different ways in which gender is constructed through South Asian literature, theatre, and film. It is intended to introduce students to the literatures of South Asia, foregrounding the ways in which gender shapes different types, or genres, of text, and how different genres of text in turn shape notions of gender. Our task will be to discover the cultural underpinnings of historical and contemporary conceptions of gender, sexuality, and love. Inasmuch as we ?play? out our gender roles our social life, this course will also serve to introduce students to the ways in which performance is imbedded in the public culture of South Asia. Students will be required to apply the skills acquired in the readings on theory to a broad set of materials, including authors from across the length and breadth of South Asia. All readings are in English. For example: Prof. K. Brown, Labor and Gender in 19th Century Literature This course will explore how a concern about creativity (and, more particularly, making a creative or meaningful life) maps onto concerns about sexual identity in nineteenth-century literature. The mechanization of labor and the removal of work from the home produced a newly pronounced sense of social division in the nineteenth century, between rich and poor, on the one hand, and between the sexes, on the other. The ensuing debates often relate the monotony of industrial labor to the triviality of domestic work, defining both factory and home as sites of making whose objects deplete the maker. Implicitly countering these two categories of failed makers is the self-made man: the maker who moves freely in a public realm and whose object of making is himself. In the texts we will read, the ?made? person emerges as both a cultural value and a source of anxiety about the inscrutability of desire, the mobility of identity, and the autonomy of objects.

ENG 324 Nineteenth-Century British Novel

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
For example: Prof. S.Eilenberg, Order and Affection This course will be devoted to forms of order, forms of affection, and the forms that relations between the two take in some of the major British novels of the 19th century. We shall see how the forces that normally bind people together--kinship, sympathy, commonality of interests complicate rather than simplify social relations and make identity problematic. We shall see also how the novel, apparently rooted deeply in the material world at the beginning of the century, begins to pull loose from or even sublimate that materiality, transforming its sofas into postures of reflection and its heavy satin wraps into tissues of spiritual connection. For example: Prof. R. Ablow, Realism When most of us think about novels, the nineteenth century British novel is what comes to mind. Jane Austen, the Brontes, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Anthony Trollope, Thomas Hardy: these are just a few of these authors that made the nineteenth century literature the golden age of the British novel, in general, and of British realism, in particular. This course will focus on what exactly makes realism ?realistic.? We will thus ask what about these texts encourages us to imagine we?re reading about real people with thoughts, feelings, and histories much like our own. We will also examine what makes them ?unrealistic? ? though more in the sense of what violates the illusion of realism. What, in other words, makes us aware of the fact that we?re not actually observing real people acting autonomously in the world but characters in a text? Why does Jane Austen?s narrator call attention to herself so insistently, for example?

ENG 325 Nineteenth-Century British Poetry

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of British poetry from the Romantics through the pre-Raphaelites. Points of focus may include relationships between poetry and the visual arts, poetry and narrative, poetry and criticism, and poetry and social constructions, including race and gender.

ENG 326 Modern British and Irish Fiction

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of novels written in the British Isles before 1945, with focus on the interrelation between literary technique and the social realities inhabited by British writers over the first half of the twentieth century. For example: Prof. D. Keane, Negotiations and Mutations This course will serve as an introduction to British and Irish fiction written between the 1880s and the 1950s, the years conventionally designated as the ?modern? period. While there will be no single, unifying thread connecting every work we read during the semester, we will examine a variety of prose fiction works (novels and short stories), as well as occasionally glance sideways at other non-prose fiction forms (poems, essays, literary and radio recordings), in order to follow the stylistic negotiations and mutations undergone in the literary field during these years. By keeping track of changes to both the form and content of literary works, we will necessarily attend to the social, political, and technological transformations that mark the period?and that, indeed, provide the lineaments for how we continue to think about being ?modern.? For example: J. Braun, Progress and Destruction This course will focus on novels by Oscar Wilde, Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Aldous Huxley, George Orwell, and Samuel Beckett, all published between 1890 and 1950. By paying attention to both content and form of the works we study, we will seek to understand what questions animate the intellectual debates and aesthetic concerns of this time period. Our particular aim will be to trace how artists and intellectuals born into a world imbued with the spirit of progress, but moving inexorably toward the devastating events of the two world wars reflect on the seismic sociopolitical and cultural shifts that shaped modern Europe.

ENG 328 Multicultural British Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Study of the literature of post-World War II Britain, beginning with the immigration of significant numbers of West Indian immigrants to England in 1948, an event triggering a process of still unfinished transformation in British identity. Materials may include novels, poetry, music, film, and art.

ENG 329 Contemporary British and Irish Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of literature of the British Isles from 1945 to the present, focusing on authors such as Evelyn Waugh, William Golding, Angela Carter, Ian McEwan, Linton Kwesi Johnson, and Zadie Smith.

ENG 330 Studies in British Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Selected topics in the literature of Britain such as pre-Raphaelitism and decadence, the Oxford movement, English travelers and explorers, the criminal in British literature. For example: Prof. R. Ablow, Historical Trauma and the Gothic From the half-ruined castles, convents, and graveyards of the 18th century through to the maze-like cities and claustrophobic suburbs of the 20th and 21st centuries, this course examines a wide range of Gothic landscapes and the perverse, fractured, and terrified subject who inhabit them. We will think about the different forms of historical trauma that have been worked out through the Gothic ? from the bloody massacres of the French Revolution through to the horrors of American slavery. We will consider how issues of gender and sexuality play out in a genre that so consistently disturbs the boundary between public and private, male and female, one generation and the next. And we will think about the challenges it poses to the way we ordinarily think about subjectivity with its confusions of inside and outside, subject and object, self and other.

ENG 331 Studies in Irish Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Focused study of Irish writing and culture, with topics like Irish revival, Irish modernism, and writing of the Irish diaspora. For example: Prof. D. Keane, Irish Writing, 1922-72 This course will focus on Irish writing and culture produced between 1922 and 1972, the fifty years roughly between the end of one period of intense violence and the beginning of another. In the aftermath of the tremendous outpouring of literary energy that accompanied the political struggles for Irish self-determination and independence in the first decades of the twentieth century, Irish writing has been conventionally held to have diverged along two separate paths: one that continues with experimentally modernist and progressively internationalist forms; and another that turns its back on modernism and instead reverts to a stagnant, insular naturalism. Through our reading for this course, we will question this characterization of Irish writing after 1922, with special attention to the kinds of social critique that are enabled ? and forestalled ? by each of these broad modes of writing. The readings for this course include prose fiction (novels and short stories), poetry, drama, autobiography, and non-literary forms.

ENG 332 Early American Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of writing in a variety of genres from contact with the Americas to 1750.

ENG 333 American Literature to the Civil War

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of such topics as Native American literature and encounters, sentimentalism, slave narratives, federalism and democracy, and of such authors as Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Fuller, Hawthorne, Melville, Sedgwick, Douglass, Jacobs, Stowe, Whitman, and Dickinson. For example: Prof. K. Dauber, Is There an ?American? Literature? This course will survey American literature from its beginnings to the Civil War. We will discuss such topics as democratic writing, the representation of slavery, the form of the romance, and the "making" of American literature in a time when England served as the great influence to be undone as a model for writing in English. Throughout we will be asking "What makes American literature American?" "Is there such a thing as `American? writing, philosophy, literature?" ?Are such questions still pertinent ones?? For example: Prof. K. Dauber, The Idea of America A survey of American Literature during its ?classic? period in the nineteenth century. We will discuss such issues as the idea of the American, the form of the American novel, the poetics and politics of community formation, and democratic writing.

ENG 334 U.S. Literature From the Civil War to World War I

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Realism, naturalism, and early modernism, including work by such authors as Twain, both Henry and William James, Chesnutt, DuBois, Wharton, Chopin, Mart?, Stein, London, and Dreiser. For example: Prof. C. Miller: Reading and Writing the Civil War The Civil War was the most cataclysmic and significant event of the nineteenth century in the United States, if you can call 4 years of terrible bloodshed an "event." Around 700,000 men were killed during the war, more than in all other wars the U.S. has fought before or after put together. This course explores the way that literature anticipates and shapes the understanding of the conflict before the War, and then ways that it commemorates, rewrites, and explores meanings of the War after it took place. Major topics will be the meaning of freedom, slavery, honor, manhood, and duty--for men and women, black and white. We will read slave narratives from before the war, written during the war, and published decades after the war. We'll read letters written by soldiers while they were serving in the armed forces (Union and Confederate); Southern pro-slavery propaganda and fiction; Northern abolitionist poetry and fiction; and fiction and poetry written after the war that continues to reinterpret what the causes, issues, and suffering of the war meant in relation to the changing politics of the century. For example: Prof. N. Schmitz, The Civil War?s Undead The Civil War is before us, 1861-5, as it is before us in the forthcoming 2012 election, red states versus blue states. It won?t stay dead and buried. As Abraham Lincoln spoke at Gettysburg, November 18, 1863, soldier corpses were emerging from their graves. This course begins with the Gettysburg Address (and its response, Martin Luther King ?I have a Dream? speech at the Lincoln Memorial in 1963), then Lincoln?s Second Inaugural Address) and its response, John Wilkes Booth?s assassination soliloquy) after which we engage sublime midcentury American poetry, Walt Whitman?s elegy for the murdered Lincoln, ?When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom?d,? and a selection of terse tough poems about death by Emily Dickinson. Second sequence explores the questions, what did Samuel Langhorne Clemens, not yet Mark Twain, do in the Civil War? We will read The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, the sketch ?A True Story,? Twain?s masterpiece, the anti-Confederate Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and then the paradoxical ?Private History of a Campaign that Failed.? Here, at last, we learn what Samuel Clemens did in the Civil War. Third sequence deals with post-Civil War African American writing and then we conclude with Emma Lazarus?s ?The New Colossus.?

ENG 335 19th Century U.S. Fiction

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Examination of developments in the short story and novel in the U.S., including work by such authors as Brown, Cooper, Poe, Stowe, Hawthorne, Melville, Jacobs, Alcott, Davis, Twain, and James. For example: Prof. K. Dauber, Romance to Naturalism This course will survey the American novel from its beginning through the end of the nineteenth century. We will start with Benjamin Franklin's "Autobiography" as it provides a model for American narrative and proceed, historically, through the development of American fiction from romance to realism to naturalism. Writers that we will read include Charles Brockden Brown, the first professional novelist in the country; James Fenimore Cooper, the inventor of the cowboy-and-Indian story; Harriet Beecher Stowe, the most popular woman novelist of the era; Hawthorne and Melville, the climax of American fiction before the Civil War; Henry James and Mark Twain, who exhibit the twin poles, high and low, of American realism, and some beyond. For example: Prof. K. Dauber, The Idea of America This course surveys American Literature during its "classic" period in the nineteenth century. We will discuss such issues as the idea of the American, the form of the American novel, the poetics and politics of community formation, and democratic writing. Writers will include Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, Poe, Stowe, Douglass, and some others.

ENG 336 Studies in Nineteenth-Century U.S. Literature and History

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Topics may include abolition and the women?s movement, the Civil War, literature of industrialization, labor, and class; literature of the frontier. For example: Prof. C. Tirado-Bramen: Transatlantic Encounters: Nineteenth Century Travel Narratives Why do people travel and what role does travel writing play in the making of a national identity and a national literature? This course will explore how the United States was imagined, invented, and perceived by those who visited the country in the nineteenth century. We?ll read excerpts from Alexis de Tocqueville?s Democracy in America, and the controversial travel accounts of British writers, Charles Dickens and Frances Trollope, and their thoughts on American manners, democracy and slavery. We?ll combine these well-known accounts with lesser known hemispheric examples from Jose Mart? (Cuba) and Domingo Sarmiento (Argentina). For example: Prof. J. Holstun, Communism and 19th Century American Novels In the twentieth century, and up to the present, a strong current of anticommunism has obscured many superb American novels by communists and anarchists. We?ll try to rectify that with a varied sampling of seven novels which take up class oppression and struggle, racism and patriarchy, the utopian possibilities and authoritarian dangers of actual socialism.

ENG 337 20th Century Lit in the U.S.

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Survey and scrutiny of twentieth-century literature, examining eras, movements, and literary experimentalism; readings may include focus on various community, ethnic, and gendered forms of consciousness. For example: Prof. W. Solomon, Traumas of Progress Modernism is a cultural/artistic phenomenon that remains one of the more pressing concerns within the field of literary historiography. Why? This course will seek to answer this question gradually by examining a series of representative works produced by American novelists and poets in the first half of the twentieth century. Thematically our concerns will include the mental and corporeal impact of the city on its inhabitants, the effect of industrialization on workers, the traumas of mechanized warfare on soldiers, contemporary efforts to come to terms with modern technology, as well as the problem of addiction (alcoholism) in the era of Prohibition. From a formal perspective we will be grappling with a series of innovative works of art that frequently resist conventional expectations. Why is it that in contrast to the pleasures mass culture supplies, the reader of modernist texts is often forced to experience pain? Lastly, throughout the course we will consider experimental literary texts alongside an emerging form of popular entertainment: the movies. For example: Prof. N. Schmitz, Modernist Expatriates This course will sample classical prose writers in early modern American literature, contemporaries, friends, artistic peers, fellow expatriates: Gertrude Stein (Three Lives, Tender Buttons), Ernest Hemingway (In Our Time, The Sun Also Rises), F. Scott Fitzgerald (The Great Gatsby, major short fiction). There is a World War I and a post-World War I Paris. Monarchy has pretty much been swept off the board as a governance. In 1920 Lenin is running Russia as the Soviet Union. An old order is gone, along with its government and its art. Stein, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, in these exemplary texts, state the new values, express the new belief system, demonstrate a practice, a style, a humor, an irony. Gertrude Stein?s Three Lives challenges you to take note of the mentality and language of the working class women in immigrant German Baltimore. Dining is important in Tender Buttons. Hemingway wants you to know what to drink and how to order it. Fitzgerald does men?s fashion in Gatsby. Then out of Paris, out of France, out of jazzy New York and Long Island, we do the great outlying solitaries in their rural backwaters, Mississippi and Florida: William Faulkner (Flags in the Dust, As I Lay Dying) Zora Neale Hurston (Their Eyes Were Watching God, short pieces).

ENG 338 The Novel in the U.S.

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of the novel as written in the U.S.; may also include attention to novels written elsewhere in North America and in South America. For example: Prof. A. Spiegel, Twain, Hemingway, Faulkner, Nabokov, Bellow, and Mailer This course will explores a selection from the best American fiction of the last one hundred years: novels by Twain, Hemingway, Faulkner, Nabokov, Bellow, and Mailer. What is uniquely ?American? about the American novel? What is so uniquely ?modern? about the modern novel? What is so arduously curious and tribal about American attitudes toward sex, crime, war, and money; race, gender, kids, and family life? A study of national character and identity in terms of the modern literary imagination. For example: Prof. R. Daly, 20th Century American Novel We shall pay attention to the cultural conversations and the cultural work of the novel in our time and place. We shall read, within the reciprocal economies of their cultural contexts, some modern, postmodern, and contemporary American novels, along with some in which the borders between these categories seem quite permeable. In works by Edith Wharton, Willa Cather, Sherwood Anderson, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Thomas Pynchon, Toni Morrison, Amy Tan, Annie Dillard, and others, we shall explore questions of representation and agency, of literature and life. We shall consider these texts as both representative (participating in the cultural conversations of their times) and hermeneutic (affording practice and skills in the arts of interpretation). For example: Prof. R. Daly, Hermeneutics and the Novel In 2006 Amanda Anderson, English department chair at Johns Hopkins, argued, ?We must keep in mind that the question, How should I live? is the most basic one? and ?must acknowledge the priority of normative questions and the fundamentally practical structure of human action and understanding.? In 2007 Jonathan Culler, of Cornell University, added that literature aids our ?engagements with otherness,? affords us ?a mental calisthenics, a practice that instructs in exercise of agency,? enables us both to ?sympathize? and to ?judge,? offers us a theoretical knowledge ?that migrates out of the field in which it originates and is used in other fields as a framework for rethinking broad questions,? and gives us an intellectual toolkit to read ?novels as a force for imagining the communities that are nations.? And in 2012 Jeffrey Nealon, from Penn State University, argued for reading literature as a preparation for living in the larger world that includes but is not limited to language and literature. He suggests that we have ?relied on a kind of linguistic nostalgia, clinging to the life raft of the hermeneutics of suspicion,? and he suggests that we need to move from ?the hermeneutics of suspicion? to a ?hermeneutics of situation,? our own situations as well as those of the texts. They and others will help, but mostly we shall read the texts themselves closely, in detail and in context. We shall read them in the contexts of both their times and ours. This course attends to the cultural conversations and the cultural work of the novel in our time and place. We shall read, within the reciprocal economies of their cultural contexts, some modern, postmodern, and contemporary American novels, along with some in which the borders between these categories seem quite permeable. We shall consider these texts as both representative (participating in the cultural conversations of their times) and hermeneutic (affording practice and skills in the arts of interpretation).

ENG 339 American Poetry

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of selected American poets, emphasizing cultural contexts, national identity, use of vernacular language, and formal innovations. May include poets writing in South America and throughout North America as well as in the U.S. For example: Prof. J. Goldman, 21st Century North American Poetries This course takes up an array of 21C North American poetries, studying works whose tendencies include incorporating nontraditional materials, writing across genres and in more than one language, and conducting research and documenting events and phenomena. Many of the poets we will consider compose book-length projects, by exploiting a particular technique or archive. Most of them work with digital and mass culture, often to bring into view, analyze, play upon, and critique contemporary technologies of selfhood and authorship. Many are involved with ecopoetics ? finding innovative forms and processes through which to engage ecological concerns, while many explore and indict the ever-more pervasive militarization of American society as well as the U.S. prosecution of war post-9/11. Many investigate neoliberalism, 21C financial practices, and new modes of labor?focusing on debt, precarity, and the continued commodification and monetarization of everything. If these works are obsessed with mapping our current contemporaneity, they are also interested in anachronism, and in alternative histories and futures, over against amnesiac presentism as the dominant mode of our present. For example: Prof. Ming-Qian Ma, Movements in 20th and 21st Century American Poetry This course is an introduction to the history of American poetry in the 20th- and 21st- Centuries. Following a chronological approach, the class will cover the period from High Modernism to the present, focusing on the major poetic movements such as Imagism, the Objectivist Movement, The Fugitive Movement, the Confessional School, the New York School, the Harlem Renaissance, the Beat Movement, the Deep Image School, the Black Mountain School, the Language Poetry Movement, the New Formal-ism, and others. The selected representative poetry texts will be read, studied, and analyzed in conjunction with a series of statements on poetics authored by the poets themselves for the purpose of under-standing the socio-political, cultural, and aesthetic contexts of their poetry work.

ENG 341 Studies in African American Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of writings by African American authors organized either by topic (for example, slavery) or time period (for example, Reconstruction or Harlem Renaissance). For example: M. McKibbin: Narratives of Slavery From a cross-dressing race ?passer? to slave-owning African Americans, from a severed penis to time travel, African American narratives of slavery are as fascinating as they are important. Since the United States is a nation built on racial slavery and defined by its racial history, American literature has perpetually confronted and mourned slavery and its consequences. As one might expect, African American voices have been central to the literary exploration of American slavery from the slave narratives of the nineteenth century to the fiction of the twenty-first. This course will sample the rich tradition of black writing in the U.S. and will consider issues such as genre, audience, authority, and the contemporary legacies of slavery as well as themes such as witness, violence, resistance, sexuality, gender, power, and family.

ENG 342 Studies in U.S. Latino/a Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Study of the cultural production of Latinos in the U.S., potentially including exploration of performance art, graphic novels and film. Themes of focus may include historical perspectives from the Mexican American War (1848) to the present day; immigration, the border and the criminalization of Latinos; hemispheric approaches to the Americas. Taught in English.

ENG 343 Studies in Native American Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Study of the oral and written literature of Native Americans. For example: Prof. S. Stevens, 20th Century and Contemporary Native American Literature and Film This course will introduce students to selected writings from a diverse community of Native American authors and poets. We will cover a range of literary forms including autobiography, short stories, poetry, novels, and plays. Most of the works to be discussed in the course are, with a few exceptions, drawn from the twentieth century and contemporary authors. In each case we will consider the artists within the context of their own tribal culture and its traditions, with attention given to relevant social history as well. We will also view and discuss a number of films produced and directed by Indigenous filmmakers.

ENG 344 Studies in Asian American Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Study of selected issues informing Asian American literary studies, including the ?model minority? myth, gender and sexuality, labor and class issues, immigration and diaspora, war, colonialism, refugee dynamics, and the politics of genre. For example: Prof. S. Moynihan, Trauma in Asian American Literature This course will focus on the representation of trauma in Asian American literature. Trauma, a violent rupture marked the need to return and repeat in the attempt to know what happened (for example, flashbacks), has implications for literary texts in terms of character construction, narrative structure, and reference. For the chosen Asian American and Asian diasporic texts, we will consider how legacies of colonialism, war, internment, genocide, and racism lead to the violent fracturing of lives. We will also consider how trauma is registered on the racialized body, how it shapes the representation of the immigrant and refugee, how it affects understandings of the foreign or the strange, and how it determines modes of belonging and transnational affiliation. In our readings we will bring together contemporary theorists of trauma with novels and autobiographical texts by Asian American authors.

ENG 345 Jewish American Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Study of Jewish-American literature; focus may include the writing of Jewish immigrants in Yiddish and English; the flowering of American writing and intellectual life after World War II, including many Jewish writers; or contemporary secular, religious and assimilative, realistic and postmodernist, traumatic and celebratory writers, such as Saul Bellow, Bernard Malamud, Isaac Bashevis Singer, and Philip Roth.

ENG 346 Comparative Ethnic Literatures

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of various cultural, racial and literary traditions through comparison of two or more ethnic literatures. Students will think through the theoretical problems of comparison, which insist on maintaining historical specificity even while developing nuanced formulations of hybridity and cross-cultural dialogue. For example: Prof. S. Moynihan, Asian American and African American Literature This course brings together Asian American and African American texts to destabilize our understandings of race; to situate racial formations in political and historical moments marked by the intersections of race, class, gender, sexuality, and national and transnational affiliations; and to consider how literary strategies facilitate political engagement with these issues. The course will proceed in four parts. Part I ?Racial Ambiguity and the Dynamics of Passing?; Part II ?Formations of Racial Consciousness in National and Transnational Discourses?; Part III ?Gender and the Contradictions of Resistance?; and Part IV ?Historical Legacies, Cultural Re-imaginings.?

ENG 347 Visions of America

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Close study of texts in which American writers attempt to create, define, or revise our sense of a national culture, considered within their larger cultural contexts. For example: Prof. R. Daly, The Making of American Culture This will explore classic American literature, focusing what it meant in the making of American culture and what it means for us now. We shall read selections, most of them quite short, from many authors, and we shall explore their connections and what they can tell us about the arts of making sense of both literature and life in America. For example: Prof. S. Cope: Hauntings, Ghosts, and Hallucinations in American Literature According to sociologist Avery Gordon, haunting ?is a constituent element of modern social life. It is neither premodern superstition nor individual psychosis; it is a generalizable social phenomenon of great import.? In this course, we will take the moniker ?visions of America? somewhat literally, investigating the critical and literary functions of figures of haunting, madness, and hallucinations (yes, ?visions?) as well as literary figurations of absence and invisibility in a cross-cultural American context. We will read extensively in fiction, poetry, myth, nonfiction, and trans-generic writings in order to explore the various meanings that ?visions,? ghosts, apparitions, and so forth have played in ?modern? American literature (ca. 1850 ? present).

ENG 348 Studies in U.S. Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Selected texts and topics in the literature of the United States?for example, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Mountain School, literature and film of the Depression era, war in U.S. literature. For example: Prof. W. Solomon, Black Humor This course begins with two of the most vital decades in American literary history with several examples of the controversial phenomenon classified at the time as ?black humor.? In this initial portion of the course, we will read Vladimir Nabokov, Chester Himes, and Flannery O?Connor. Next we will juxtapose Joseph Heller?s countercultural classic, Catch-22 and John Barth?s The Floating Opera. All of the texts listed above feature a considerable number of scenes of disturbingly explicit yet decidedly comic violence, and indeed these materials proved offensive to many when first published. Our goal will be to move toward an understanding of the imperatives motivating the authors to produce such outrageous (albeit quite popular) fictions. We will then turn our attention to works of prose that unsettled in provocative fashion the distinction between factual discourse and fictive narration, such as Hunter S. Thompson?s Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Joan Didion?s Democracy, and E. L. Doctorow?s The Book of Daniel. During the course we will also investigate changing attitudes toward technology; racial tensions in the country; shifting gender relationships; as well as the interplay between literature and other media (music and film). For example: Prof. W. Solomon: Beat Literature Our primary object of investigation in this course will be the Beat movement. Our core prose texts in this regard will be Jack Kerouac?s On The Road and William Burroughs? Junky, though we will look at a few selections from John Clellon Holmes? Go! (1952) and chapters from Burroughs notorious Naked Lunch. In addition we will read Allen Ginsberg?s poetry as well as selected poems by minor Beat writers Gregory Corso, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Bob Kaufman, and Leroi Jones/Amiri Baraka. The course will also include historically adjacent works by writers such as James Baldwin, Flannery O?Connor, Elaine Dundy, and Paul Bowles. The latter two authors allow us to address the situation of the American expatriate in France and Africa respectively?a topic we will also explore by way of John Osborne?s play, Look Back in Anger. In the latter portion of the course we will trace the lega-cy of the Beats into the 60s and 70s by reading two cult classics: Richard Farina?s Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up to Me and Tom Robbins? Even Cowgirls Get the Blues. This course will consider cinematic parallels to the literary phenomena, focusing on the work of American underground or independent filmmakers such as John Cassavetes (Shadows), and it will situate the achievement of the Beats in the context of the contemporaneous emergence of the first generation of rock and roll stars (Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley, Little Richard, Elvis Presley, etc.)

ENG 349 Studies in British and American Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Selected topics emphasizing the transatlantic connections of literature written in English; transatlantic Puritanism, literature of the `new woman,? Freud and modern fiction, literature of World War I, family history.

ENG 351 Modern and Contemporary Drama

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Selections from British, American, and other world dramatists since the turn of the twentieth century. For example: J. Braun, 20th Century Avant-Garde Theatre This course explores the evolution of modern drama and particularly the emergence of 20th- century avant-garde. We will study, in chronological order, the major movements and their representative playwrights, beginning with realism (relevant plays of Ibsen, Gorky), and moving through symbolism (Maeterlinck), expressionism, futurism, surrealism, and theatre of the absurd (Beckett, Ionesco). By reading plays, manifestoes, and related theoretical essays, with occasional glances at painting, we will seek to understand what makes these plays modern and how they interrogate the socio-political and aesthetic transformations of the modern period.

ENG 352 Modern and Contemporary Fiction

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Study of significant fiction written since the mid to late nineteenth century, including developments in fictional form. A: The Modern Novel Study of the modern novel including movements such as realism, naturalism, formalism, minimalism, maximalism, and magic realism. Topics of focus may include war, familial and sexual relations, urban life, national identity, and portraits of artists. B: Short Fiction A study of what short fiction does and how it does it. Readings drawn from a wide variety of authors from a large number of countries who write on a range of subjects. C: Contemporary Fiction Study of contemporary fiction, including various developments in the form, with a focus on fiction by living writers. For example: C. Milletti: What Writers Think About When They Think About Writing: Trends and Countertrends in Contemporary Writing This course will focus on novels published recently?many within the past 3 years?in order to consider both current trends and counter trends in literary fiction. In particular, we will consider the ways in which the conventions of realist fiction continue to be staged within the contemporary novel? how representations of the real work against, and with respect to, the cultural landscape of the postmodern?as well as how realist conventions are resisted by novels that appear on the very same bookshelf. If realist novels ?correspond,? as Susan Suleiman notes, ?to what most of us think of, in our less theoretical moments, as the `natural order of the world,?? then our class will try to draw some conclusions about what kind of ?order? realism offers: how it has been shared in the past, the ways in which it has become troubled in the present, as well as our changing understanding of what the ?real? represents in the era of ?truthi-ness.? Selected novels?drawn from both ?trade? as well as ?small press? publications?will, as a result, most often take an innovative stance with respect to the concept of the real. We will also write book reviews over the course of the semester, try to get them published, and several fiction readings to meet authors and discuss their work in person. For example: Prof. H. Wolf, Transnational Short Fiction The emphasis of this course will be on the relationship between the American short story and novella and writing in English in other part of the world (United Kingdom, India, Africa) in an attempt to isolate, if possible, the essential qualities of the American short story (or, to discover, perhaps, that the essential qualities are, in fact, quite superficial and lose their importance in the light of shared characteristics). Is our notion of a ?character? culturally determined, or do we find something like a DNA or personality distributed around the world? We?ll read something about short fiction and creative writing and students will have an option to write some short fiction as an act in itself and as an act of criticism as part of the work for the course. The instructor hopes that the course will attract students who believe or who would like to believe, that a turn of phrase, the structure of a sentence, a brilliant analogy, or a well-chosen word can change the course of one?s consciousness and have some practical implications for one?s life.

ENG 353 Experimental Fiction

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Exploration of innovations in fictional forms by examining the strategies and techniques writers deploy to undermine conventions in the novel and short story. Experimentation in fiction is an ongoing generative force accompanying the historic development of the novel, from eighteenth-century writers such as Lawrence Sterne and Daniel Defoe to the postmodern techniques that arise in fiction by authors such as John Barth, Robert Coover, and Kathy Acker. For example: Prof. J. Conte, The Supernatural and the Mind Postmodern fiction faces the following dilemma: the supernatural (God and other channeled media) has retired, leaving us to our own devices of transmission; the natural world (species decimation and climate change) appears chaotic and threatens to overrun boundaries; and the mind (or consciousness; or possibly ?liberal subjectivity?) is itself subject to a host of newly-diagnosed dysfunctions, not all responsive to psychopharmaceutical therapy. The fictive response falls into two categories: either formulate a plan with exacting design and stick to it, maniacally; or participate in the inevitable debris and its attendant uncertainties. For example: R. Muhlstock, Experiments in Newness The myth surrounding literature is that it must be read from left to right, top to bottom, page one to ?the end.? But the works brought together in this course show that these ?rules? for literature need not be heeded. Throughout this semester we will encounter a broad spectrum of 20th & 21st-century texts that challenge literary conventions through experimentation with voice, language, the myriad tropes and formulae for literary expression, and archetypal patterns of narrative, the elements of which can be combined and synthesized into new substances: new genres, new prose forms, new syntax, new strategies for reading and making meaning. Just how each experiment evokes a particular reading and interpreting experience will be the focus of our literary analysis as we move through a series of fictions that propose, among other things, that literature need not contain itself to any one template.

ENG 354 Life Writing

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Critical exploration of ?life writing? or the various textual representations structured around a ?life,? featuring autobiography and/or biography, and possibly including forms such as testimony and self-representation in contemporary media. For example: Prof. S. Moynihan, Autobiography The term ?life writing? refers to texts that work to represent the self. Usually labeled ?autobiographical,? life writing can take a broad range of forms. This course will address a selection of American life-writing narratives to engage some of the more prominent issues of autobiographical projects, including the formation of the autobiographical subject, the status of memory, temporal frameworks, representations of historical events, political imperatives, understandings of truth and deceit, trauma and testimony. We will address autobiographical texts that test the borders with fiction, and texts that stretch our understandings of travel writing. Forms of life writing that are shaped by difference? particularly in terms of race, gender, embodiment, and ethnic and national affiliation?will play a prominent role. For example: Prof. A. Lyon, Self-Representation Life writing describes genres including biography, autobiography, diaries, letters, travel writing, testimonies, autoethnography, personal essays and, more recently, digital forms such as blogs and websites Life writing is concerned with identity, memory, agency, and history; at its core is the issue of who gets representation, who gets to tell the story. For example: R. Reid, Difference through Writing Writing is one way in which we have the opportunity to see through the eyes of others and reach beyond the limitations of our situation. How is knowledge made from experience? How can personal accounts of experience give us a different sort of historical perspective? What are the power dynamics involved in whose voices get heard and whose stories enter into the realm of historical record? These are just some of the questions we will explore as we read and write in the genres of life writing. In this course we specifically explore the autobiographical and memoir and personal essay genres.

ENG 355 Popular Fiction

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of various popular fictional genres, including crime fiction, science fiction, and romance novels.

ENG 356 Popular Culture

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Examination of issues relating to the study of popular culture through consideration of a wide range of media, including music, television, film, fiction, and the internet. A: Celebrity Culture Study of the role fame plays in American culture providing a history of the concept, clarifying the terminological complexities that surround fame, and examining the ways in which popular culture has propagated, reflected, and offered insight into our obsession with fame. For example: Prof. A. Spiegel, Genre Fiction This course will be a study of the world's most popular genre narratives: Westerns, Crime films, Horror, Sci-fi and Adventure Romance. A psychological probe into the collective dreamlife of American men and women in terms of the nature, origins, and development of some of the most durable stories ever told. We'll examine a whole raft of popular novels and films less as art and more as a species of myth, artifact, and dream-data; and in this manner, work our way through the fears, lusts and biases of the Republic from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. For example: Prof. D. Schmid, Fame and American Culture One of the least contentious statements we can make about contemporary America is to say that we are more obsessed than ever by fame. Whether it takes the form of desire for the lifestyles of the famous (the E! network, entertainment magazines), our enjoyment of their self-destructive tendencies (Perez Hilton, TMZ.com, celebrity trials), or the possibility of becoming famous (American Idol, So You Think You Can Dance), the contemporary engagement with fame seems total, undifferentiated, and to have always been with us. This course will anatomize the role fame plays in American culture by providing a history of the concept, clarifying the terminological complexities that surround fame, and examining the ways in which popular culture has not only propagated and reflected our obsession with fame, but has also frequently provided insightful and self-conscious analyses of that obsession. What are the origins of the concept of fame? What?s the difference between fame and celebrity? Between fame and notoriety? Why are we so interested in fame? Should we be doing something more valuable with our time instead?!

ENG 357 Contemporary Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Literature of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries and its aesthetic and ideological antecedents. For example: Prof. J. Conte, The Novel of Globalization We now live in an epoch of global economic interdependency, and we endure a globalization of culture that will not abate. On a visit in 2011 to Kazan in the Republic of Tatarstan, the majority of passengers on the tour bus decided that, rather than visit the centuries-old Sunni mosque, they wanted to shop at the IKEA, the Swedish multinational housewares corporation, which had set its giant footprint down on the outskirts of the city. The homogenization of culture through the dispersal of consumer goods and the saturation of mass media destroys the indigenous and authentic artifact. Native languages and religious practices, ethnic foods, handicraft arts and clothing, traditional music and entertainment?all face slow extinction. Some argue, however, that positive attributes of globalization can be found in the cross-pollination or eclecticism that more readily acquaints one culture with the unique differences of another, sometimes leading to creative appropriation, pluralism, and tolerance. While we won?t be reading Tatar poetry in this course, we will examine the novel of globalization that no longer takes as its object a unified national culture but presents and critiques the technological consumerism, transnational politics, and multinational corporatism that have come to dominate global discourse. For example: Prof. J. Conte, The New Social Realist Novel This course will examine the revival of the social novel prompted by Jonathan Franzen and exemplified by his recent book, Freedom (2010), which depicts a middle- American dysfunctional family. His brand of social realism is characterized by the objective representation of recognizable types (ourselves, only slightly embellished), in a prose style that mimics the contemporary vernacular (our voices, barely, if at all, embellished), and encompassing conflicts (the discontents of family and married life; substance abuse and psychological debilities; loneliness in a time of social media) that are ordinary, if only slightly more desperate than our own. In point of contrast, we?ll then read Zadie Smith?s prize-winning White Teeth (2000), which stirs together a postmodern fabulist style with a multinational and multiethnic cast of characters in London. More self-conscious in its bearing and more attuned to global culture and its transnational conflicts, Smith?s novel will in both style and content allow us to evaluate two prominent strains in contemporary fiction beyond the often insular American market.

ENG 361 Modern and Contemporary Poetry

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Study of poetry written from the end of the nineteenth century up to the present day, potentially including poetry in translation from several cultures and places. A. Modern and Contemporary British Poetry Study of twentieth- and twenty-first century poetry and poetry movements in the British Isles. B. Modern and Contemporary North American Poetry Study of twentieth- and twenty-first century poetry and poetry movements of North America. For example: Prof. S. McCaffery, 20th Century Avant-Garde Poetry This course explores the emergence and transformation of primarily twentieth and twenty-first century Anglophone poetics in North America as well as the twentieth-century emergence of the Avant-Garde. Authors and topics covered include Imagism, Vorticism, Feminist Poetics and Poetry, Italian and Russian Futurism, Dada, Surrealism, Objectivism, the Beats, the Harlem Renaissance and Negritude, Projective Verse, the New American Poetry of the 1960s, the New York School and Language Poetry. Alongside texts to be studied, analyzed and compared are relevant theoretical texts largely by poets themselves. For example: Prof. Ming Qian Ma, Poetry and Poetics This course will introduce students to modern and contemporary poetry in the 20th century, with an emphasis on the American poetry. Following a chronological approach, the class will cover the period from the so-called High Modernism to the present, studying the major poetic movements such as Imagism, the Objectivists, the Fugitives, the Confessional School, the New York School, the Harlem Renaissance, the Beat Movement, the Deep Image School, the Language poetry, and others. The overarching topic of our critical inquiry is the poetry-poetics relationship, as it is perceived and practiced by diverse poets in their corresponding socio-political, cultural, and aesthetic contexts. The class will focus on close reading of selected poets representing each poetic movement in conjunction with selected criticisms by these poets.

ENG 362 Poetry Movements

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of poetry movements, sometimes focusing on a single movement and sometimes on comparative study of two or more; movements considered may include Romanticism, the Pre-Raphaelites, Modernism, the Beats, the Black Arts movement, and LANGUAGE Poetry. A: Poetry and Poetics of Innovation Study of the poetry and poetics of innovation; focus may include the avant-garde movements of the early twentieth century in Europe, modernism, and contemporary innovative poetics as practiced in North America, the British Isles, and Europe. For example: Prof. M. Mi Kim, Poetry and Culture This course focuses on contemporary American poetry and examines in particular, the multiple stances and corresponding propositions taken up by innovative American poetry and poetics. Together, we will address: how does poetry respond to its cultural moment? How has poetry changed in response to emerging technologies and forces of globalization? In one sense, this class will familiarize you with the array of movements, aesthetic/theoretical frames, and poetics that are embedded in American poetry (e.g., L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Poetry, poetry on and off the page, or recent innovative writing by women). We will consider the various ways in which contemporary American poetry is inflected by its multilingual and multicultural condition. The abiding objective of this course is to further your practice of attentive reading, to open up the range of your critical discourse in relation to poetry, and to invite you to produce criticism attuned to the historical and material conditions under which poetry arrives. For example: Prof. J. Goldman: Contemporary Poetry Foundations Our focus in this course will be three roughly concurrent, North American poetry constellations: contemporary African American poetries; contemporary Documentary/Research poetries; and Language/post- Language feminist poetries. We will examine the separate traditions behind them and, as the course progresses, tease out their varying approaches to such common concerns as: social belonging, otherness and othering, and the crossing of social borderlines; the formation of subjects through language and the potential undoing of languages mirroring of social hierarchy; the politics of representation and narrative and the haunting of representation and narrative by what they exclude or repress; the contesting of fact and history and scrutiny of processes by which fact and history are made; the importance of who speaks, who knows, who values; the use of poetry as a means of inquiry and knowledge-creation; intertextual consort with many kinds of texts, and the deployment of specialized vocabularies and idioms; languages mediation of world and thought and experimentation with the relationship of the verbal to the non-verbal; appropriate or allowable feeling and the staging of the poem as conductor (or refuser or rerouter) of affect; the innovation and creative repurposing of poetic forms, including attention to languages visual and sonic aspects. For example: Prof. Ming-Qian Ma: Innovation and the Denaturing of Experience Focusing on the American poetry scene since the 1950s, this class will study what has been variously called the innovative, the experimental, the exploratory, or the avant-garde poetry. Under the general rubric of cultural postmodernism? defined by N. Katherine Hayles as the ?denaturing of experience, which means the realization that what has always been thought of as the essential, unvarying components of human experience are not natural facts of life but social constructions, we will read the representative poetry texts and examine their innovative writing practices in the four areas of denaturing outlined by Hayles: the denaturing of language, the denaturing of context, the denaturing of time, and the denaturing of the human.

ENG 363 Modernist Poetry

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Examination of modernist poetry, with attention to individual poets and to modernist thought. Poets may include Yeats, Stein, Loy, Pound, Williams, H.D., Moore, Stevens, Toomer, Crane, and Hughes, among others. For example: Prof. Stacy Hubbard, Poetry and the ?isms? of Modernism This course will explore British, Irish and American poetry written between 1890 and 1940. We will read poetry in a wide variety of styles and modes, as well as essays and manifestoes that debate what poetry has been in the past and what it ought to be and do in the twentieth century and beyond. Modernism is full of ?isms?: symbolism, imagism, futurism, classicism, nationalism, feminism, vernacularism, regionalism, socialism, etc. We?ll explore what these various movements were all about, and why poets in this period felt compelled to join coteries, formulate ?systematic? methods, start their own journals, and work at either restricting or broadening the audience for poetry. We?ll also look into the many experimental ?little magazines? that rose up around modernism, and visit the university?s superb poetry archives in order to examine some of these.

ENG 364 Debates in Modernism

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Exploration of major issues and debates in the study of modernism, including potential focus on modernist manifestos, movements, philosophies, theories of language, and questions of definition. For example: Prof. C. Miller, What Is Modernism? What is modernism? Who gets to define it? Why did so many artists, musicians, architects, and writers become fascinated with the ?new? in ways that rejected primary aesthetic structures of the past (like realism, or the idea of beauty) at the beginning of the twentieth century? This course will introduce some of the key works published during the first few decades of the twentieth century in relation to such questions. We will read this literature in the context of what modernists themselves claimed they were doing, or wanted to do. After briefly looking at innovations in the visual arts and music during this period as points of comparison, we will read literary manifestos espousing the ideals or programs of Futurism, Vorticism, Imagism, and feminism, and we will read poets and fiction writers who take up, reject, or revise these programs in their own writing. We will also look at several little magazines in which the writers of this period first published their work, both to understand the cultural context of that publication and to see the less formal aesthetic statements those magazines produced. Students will be responsible for reading and analyzing artist statements, some of the great literature of the period, and some of the more ephemeral work published side by side with that of the great writers in little magazines.

ENG 365 British Modernism

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of writers and the literary field in the United Kingdom during the modernist period, with attention devoted to topics like the rise of mass politics and mass culture, imperialism and colonial administration, and particularly British responses to transnational literary formations. For example: Prof. Damien Keane, Mass Culture This course will survey the literary field in the United Kingdom and Ireland between 1925 and 1950, with an aim to understanding how the status, value, and use of works of art changed during these years in response to the rise of mass politics, mass culture, and mass media; to expanding domestic readerships and transnational literary formations; and to alterations to the manner in which both writers and readers conceived of literary production and reception. While readings for the course will touch on poetry and non-fiction prose, the semester will be primarily devoted to prose fiction (novels, novellas, and short stories), ranging from canonical ?greats? to lesser known texts ? and, indeed, we will attend to the evaluative divisions between ?literature? and ?pulp,? ?art? and ?propaganda,? ?good? readers and ?bad,? that were strained and reinvented several times over during this period. Along the way, we will encounter typewriters, gramophone players, and wireless sets, secretarial workers, nightwalkers, and cabaret singers, loafers, demobilized soldiers, spies, paranoiacs, and gigolos, moneyed drawing rooms, secret espionage backrooms, the trenches, and a lower middle class bed. For example: Prof. J. Valente: Bloomsbury at Large Modernism was a cultural enterprise composed of various relatively self-contained cells and coteries, from revolutionary political cadres, like the Italian syndicalists, to Freud and his small circle, who launched the era of psychoanalysis, to the salons of Natalie Barney and Gertrude Stein, to literary and aesthetic programs such as Futurism, Surrealism, and Dadaism. A few of these movements were especially wide-ranging in their intellectual concerns and correspondingly ?interdisciplinary? in their approach. For minority revivals, like the Harlem Renaissance or the Celtic Renaissance, such versatility represented and essential facet of their core mission, the recovery and public rehabilitation of a long devalued national tradition in its entirety. For the bourgeois mandarins of Bloomsbury, the cultivation of an intellectually manifold yet closely integrated movement, rare in metropolitan circles, seems to have been an extension less of their social personality than of their political and ideological position, what we might call their high liberal radicalism. That at any rate will be the kind of question to be explored in this course. What are the motives and stakes not just of the signature texts and major interventions of the Bloomsbury group, but of its distinctive mode of dialectical cohesion. How were specific discourses, and particularly the literary discourses, affected by their genetic kinship with the others? And how did the historical moment enable and constrain Bloomsbury experimentalism?

ENG 367 Psychoanalysis and Culture

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Introduction to texts, concepts, and debates in the tradition of Freudian psychoanalysis. Special emphasis upon the application of psychoanalysis within non-clinical fields (literature, linguistics, law, history, politics, religion, sociology, anthropology, economics, mathematics). For example: Steven Miller: Freud, Literature, and Society This course will provide students with an intensive introduction to the work of Sigmund Freud through detailed reading of his texts that examine the social bond and its origins. Freud developed psychoanalysis as a medical treatment for patients suffering from mental disorders, but he quickly realized that these disorders are as much social as they are biological; and that psychoanalysis promised to provide new insights about the hitherto unsuspected bases of society, ethics, politics, and aesthetics. After establishing the basics of psychoanalytic theory and practice, our discussions will revolve primarily around the texts where Freud examines the origins of human society and, further, where he considers the role of literature in society. For example: Prof. R. Feero, The Freud Effect This course explores how things are different after Freud: we live in a whole new climate of opinion. Or, as Foucault has argued, ?Freud himself has become a `founder of discursivity? who is not just the `author? of his books but has `established an endless possibility of discourse? (Davis and Schleifer). Our major goal will be to check the weather by closely reading several of Freud? major texts, watching him work with an eye toward the sense of ?complexity? or ?multiplicity? that he articulates, his notion of multiple causes for single effects and multiple meanings for seemingly singular texts. Our second goal will be to read this effect as it bears on literature and criticism with an emphasis on the new ways of reading that Freudian discourse makes possible ? that is, ways of putting his work to work.

ENG 368 Literature and Religion

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of works of literature structured around the representation of religious experiences, traditions, or institutions and examination of the influence of various religions upon practices of reading and interpretation. For example: Prof. S. Miller, Judaism and Christianity in 19th and 20th Century Literature and Philosophy This course offers students the opportunity to consider the place of monotheistic religion within 19th and 20th century literature and philosophy. We will focus on texts whose engagement with religious traditions ? especially Judaism and Christianity ? emphasizes and revolves around a central paradox (such as the ?death of God? in Nietzsche or the ?church of Christ without Christ? in Flannery O?Connor). These texts will thus make it possible to understand the way religions also open fundamental questions (questions not raised elsewhere) that they are powerless to resolve. What is religion, then, if we approach it in terms of the inquiry to which these questions give rise? How does literature make it possible to sustain or endure the paradoxes that occasion such questions?

ENG 369 Literary Theory

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Close attention to theories that attempt to account for the specificity of the literary object. Discussion may focus on questions of reading and interpretation, linguistics and poetics, narrative, rhetoric, genre, literature and the arts, or politics and education. For example: Prof. D. Anastasopoulos, Critical Approaches to Literature and Culture This course will address questions posed by reading literature and other cultural artifacts as we survey the major schools of modern and postmodern literary criticism and theory, including formalism, psychoanalysis, gender and race theory, genre theory, new historicism and cultural studies, post-colonial criticism, deconstruction, among others. We?ll begin with some basic questions: How do texts and other cultural artifacts produce meaning? What do they mean? How do authors and readers work to produce this meaning? Why are social roles and identities important in reading? How do texts intersect with and transform culture? We will survey a wide range theory; thus, the course is necessarily selective and not comprehensive. For example: Prof. Ming-Qian Ma, Niklas Luhmann and Systems Theory This course introduces students to the leading German social theorist Niklas Luhmann and his systems theory, a way of thinking about society that resonates, both conceptually and methodologically, with a variety of contemporary literary theories ranging from poststructuralism, cultural studies, to post-humanism. Beginning with Luhmann?s newly published Introduction to Systems Theory, the class will then read a number of his key essays in which he establishes the foundational concepts of his theory and, after that, his book titled Art As a Social System, which presents a specific case study detailing Luhmann?s analysis of art as a social, perceptual, and functional system.

ENG 370 Critical Race Theory

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of the writings of a scholarly and politically committed movement created mainly by progressive intellectuals of color, focusing on the law?s centrality in constructing and maintaining social domination and subordination.

ENG 371 Queer Theory

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Interdisciplinary study of how human sexuality can be conceived outside the terms of fixed identity; readings may include work by theorists and authors such as Foucault, Butler, Sedgwick, Delany, Winterson, and Halberstam. For example: Prof. T. Dean, History of Queer Theory This course offers an interdisciplinary investigation of the set of ideas about sexuality and sexual politics that, over the past couple decades, have come to be known as ?queer theory.? Does ?queer? attempt to bridge Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender identities or does it aspire to go beyond identity categories? What kind of politics is possible after identity politics? We will consider a wide range of ways of thinking about gender and sexuality in our attempt to assess the pros and cons of different descriptions of sex.

ENG 372 Feminist Theory

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
A survey of several feminist frameworks for thinking about gender, sex, sexuality, race, class, and oppression including a consideration of the ways in which gender has left its mark on literary history and culture. For example: Prof. A. Lyon, American Feminist Theory Feminist theory is fun, funny, even necessary for everyday life, but to own it, you do have to read, write, and discuss it. In this course, focused on the quest for gender justice, we will read feminist theory ? also a few poems, a short story, a speech or two ? but mostly we?ll read American feminist theory. We will start with key figures in the nineteenth century and work our way through the twentieth century. I will try not to overwhelm you with abstraction, but rather try to give you ?speculative instruments? to help to you see more in a reading, event or pattern than you would see without the lens of feminist theory.

ENG 374 Bible As Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Extensive reading in the Bible, with some consideration of modern biblical scholarship and exploration of the more important uses of religious and biblical ideas in various periods of English and American literature. For example: Prof. K. Dauber, Bible as Philosophy One of the most influential and perennially popular books in the world, the Bible has been a fundamental pillar in the construction of Western civilization. Part history, part literature, part philosophy, part law-book, it raises still relevant questions concerning ethics, community, knowledge, the place of man in the world, and the very idea of a responsible self. We will read selections from the Bible including Genesis, Exodus, Deuteronomy, Samuel, several of the prophets, Job, Ecclesiastes, Jonah, some Psalms, and the Gospels of Matthew and John. Our concern will not, strictly speaking be theological. But we will consider religion from the point of view of philosophy, what this or that concept of God means for living a good life and under-standing the world. For example: Rick Feero, Genre and the Bible The Bible remains the most ubiquitous of books, but as such it may also be imperceptible as a text, present in clich?d forms, banished to a religious realm, or hidden in popular and literary allusions. We don?t know what we think we know. Hence, to borrow a phrase from Marcus J. Borg, we?ll attempt to ?read the Bible again for the first time. This course will center on close readings of selected Biblical texts, including, Genesis/Exodus, Proverbs, Job, Jonah, Esther, Amos, Mark, Luke/Acts, Romans, and Revelations. We will focus on the literary aspects of the Bible--problems of genre, composition and authorship, historical background and setting. In short, we will begin with the perspective that the Bible produces meaning through varied and overlapping literary forms (such as narrative, prophecy, and parable) and literary strategies (such as metaphor, allegory and hyperbole). Our approach will thus be situated between two perspectives, noting the traces of multiple sources and intentions uncovered by previous forms of Biblical criticism?two divergent creation stories opening and resurfacing in the stories of Genesis; older collections of saying and parables incorporated into and disrupting the narrative of Mark?but using newer forms of criticism to see this disorder as inherent to and productive of a wider literary meaning.

ENG 375 Heaven, Hell, and Judgment

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Examination of the iconography and literature of the sacred tradition in art. For example: Prof. D. Christian, Heaven, Hell & Judgment The course will consider ideas and images of eternal reward and punishment ? stories and pictures of heaven, hell, and judgment from ancient Sumner to modern film. We will begin with the oldest known story of the underworld, five-thousand year-old Sumerian goddess Inanna?s descent ?From the Great Above to the Great Below.? We?ll look at the Egyptian weighing of the soul at death against the feather of Maat or justice, at Odysseus?s and Aeneas?s explorations of the worlds of the dead, at Plato?s and popular ideas of what?s next. We?ll also consider Biblical apocalypses, Sheol, Hades and heaven, medieval journeys to heaven and hell, Dante?s Inferno and Paradiso, and Blakes?s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell. We?ll look at paintings, mosaics, and sculptures of Judgment, heaven and hell, including especially some Byzantine art, Romanesque churches, Giotto, Signorelli, Michaelangelo, and Bosch. We?ll close with the 1946 classic film, A Matter of Life or Death, released in America as Stairway to Heaven. Through these verbal and visual imaginations we?ll explore ethical and religious ideas of the judgment of good and evil, punishment and reward.

ENG 376 Islamic Epic

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Heroic literature in medieval Arabic, Persian, and Turkic cultures. For example: Prof. J. Frakes, Islamic Epic This course will explore the wide world of epic narrative in a diverse range of Islamic cultures: the political and psychological dilemma of the father-son conflict, the variety of symbolic and mythic settings of heroic-nomadic culture, the bridal-quest epic, the racial identity of the hero as determinative, religious conflict as ethnicized epic conflict, the moralizing tale of a trickster hero, and three differing takes on romantic love: the epic scale adultery and betrayal, the Sufic transcendental-symbolic mode, and a Hindu-infused Sufi mode. It seems almost a given in Islamic epic that cross-cultural conflict functions as the basis of heroic values and the motivator of heroic action. Islamic epic society is always a culture in conflict with itself: racial, religious, generational, governmental, dynastic. All texts are read in English translation.

ENG 377 Mythology

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Exploration of mythology both as a kind of knowing and as ?sacred stories? in religion, literature, anthropology, psychoanalysis, and science. A: Mythology of the Americas Study of the myths, tales, and legends told by the native peoples of the New World, which open roads that lead the imagination into alternative worlds. The class will read and listen to the words of native storytellers, orators, singers, and dramatists. For example: Prof. J. Frake: Gods, Heroes and Dragons: Germanic Mythology The course explores the importance of the Germanic mythological corpus for medieval literature and on its continued influence on post- Renaissance European culture. In each case a selection of material has been made to illustrate the uses to which Germanic mythology has been adapted: artistic, social, political, didactic. The course content ranges from the `high art? of Wagner to the `triviality? of ?Thor comics,? from Beowulf to Borges. The course deals with Germanic mythology from four different perspectives, each of which is characteristic of one of the stages of the interpretation and reception of the originally religio-mythological texts: 1) myth as religious artifact; 2) myth as an integral source of cultural values and artistic material; 3) myth as Romantic ideal and artificial source of cultural values (Wagner, Tolkien); 4) myth as ideological vehicle for an artificial system of values (modern exploitations in politics, film, video games, clubs). For example: Prof. D. Tedlock, Myth in the Americas Myths not only create imaginal worlds that offer alternatives to the life world, but also offer keys to the interpretation of the life world itself, revealing a mythic level of significance in everyday events. Myths also give shape and meaning to dreams and visions, and dreams and visions give rise to further myths. This course will try to catch those moments when the mythic world comes in contact with the world of experience. We will undertake a close reading of selected myths from the Americas, attempting to enter imaginal worlds and to look back at the life world from a distance. We will consider myths that come down to us from storytellers, speechmakers, singers, and dramatists. In addition to readings, lectures, videos, and discussions, there will be guest appearances by Native American storytellers. For example: Prof. D. Christian, Myths of Origin This class will consider myths of origin and sexual organization from all over the world, ancient and modern. Where and how did the world and we come to be?

ENG 379 Film Genres

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of various film genres (melodrama, horror, film noir, comedy, science fiction, westerns) and sub-genres (maternal melodrama, splatter films, police procedurals, cyberpunk) as artistic texts and as Hollywood marketing strategies. For example: Prof. J. Frakes: The Middle Ages on Film When one thinks of medievalist films, Monty Python?s ?Holy Grail? or Heath Ledger in ?A Knight?s Tale? or Richard Gere in ?First Knight? might come to mind. Interestingly, many if not most serious and important film directors have almost from the beginning of the art form made at least one major medievalist film: Lang, Bergman, Eisenstein, Bresson, Kurosawa, Tarkovsky, Herzog, Greenaway, and of course Terry Gilliam. Spanning the history of film-making, these medievalist films more often than not provide insight into the filmmaker?s conception of history and of contemporary politics and social issues far more than of a particular attempt to `recreate? the Middle Ages on film. A survey of medievalist film-making is a survey of twentieth-century political and social movements and in fact also a survey of the history of film-making. In this course we will conduct a comparative study of a broad range of medieval literature and film representations of the Middle Ages from Europe, the Middle East, and East Asia, with a focus on the social function of the texts and films in their contemporary historical contexts. For example: Prof. A. Spiegel, American Genre Films Some of the most durable and popular stories ever told have been presented in a variety of American genre films. This semester the emphasis will be on Fantasy: Horror and Science Fiction, Musicals, Swashbucklers, Martial Arts, and some of the dreamier specimens of Film Noir; works like The Bride of Frankenstein, Blade Runner, Singin? in the Rain, The Prisoner of Zenda, Blue Velvet, Enter the Dragon, and more. How much realism can be squirreled into an escapist format? We?ll find out. For example: Prof. Joan Copjec: Post-War Image The flight from urban centers, which began after WWII in the U.S., was preceded by a new category of film set exclusively in claustrophobic but eerily empty urban spaces. These films ? which came to be known as ?noir? or ?black? films ? coincided not only with the collapse of the urban dream of sociality and technological perfection, but also with the collapse of the institution that manufactured and sold that dream to a delighted public: the Hollywood studio system. In Europe, too ? but first of all in Italy ? cinema took an unprecedented turn: toward neo-realism. In the first part of the course we will examine classic examples of film noir genre and neo-realism to see how they joined social problems and urban space to a new conception of the cinematic image. In the second part of the course we will examine the legacy of film noir and neo-realism in more recent films in which social problems are once again conceived as problems of urban coexistence and its failures to provide suitable modes of habitation for a diverse population. We will discuss the exponential rise of slums throughout the world and how IMF has gutted local economies while pretending to help struggling countries get back on their economic feet. The political struggles that have come to divide cities along racial and ethnic lines -- in Paris, Jerusalem, and L.A., particularly -- will be discussed alongside films that depict these divisions. We will attend to appreciation of the cinematic innovations and aesthetic break-throughs which the films themselves invent in order to put these images on screen. Finally, we will discuss how the institutions of cinema, including international film festivals, play a role in defining these urban locations.

ENG 380 New Media

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of post-cinematic media and the questions these media raise regarding memory and media storage; the relations of language and literature to technology; documentation and referentiality. For example: Prof. Alex Reid, Games Studies Since the appearance of the Atari 2600 video game console in 1977, video games have become an increasingly common feature of our lives. Today, we play games on our televisions through more advanced consoles, dedicated handheld devices, personal computers, and on our mobile phones. We play games online with millions of co-players, in augmented reality, and with our bodies without controllers. In other words, video games have proliferated and mutated into a vast ecology of media, interactivity, and genre. Over the last 20 years, the interdisciplinary study of video games has developed into a full-blown area of scholarly practice, including many practices with their origins in English and the humanities (as well as other methods from the social sciences, computer science, engineering, and other fields). This online course will introduce the methods and foundational scholarship in games studies. For example: Derek Gee, Visual Journalism Images bombard us every day. Cameras are built into most cell phones and websites like Facebook and Instagram offer a way to publish images worldwide. But while everyone can take pictures, not everyone understands the language of the image. Images, like a carefully crafted sentence, consist of nouns and verbs, subjects and predicates. When these elements are combined artfully, the image can contain more information than a sentence or even a paragraph. A series of photographs can be arranged like a series of paragraphs to form a powerful narrative ? the photo essay. What are the elements that make a powerful photograph? What are the tools and techniques that are used to create images for publication? This class will teach students the art of visual storytelling.

ENG 381 National Cinemas

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Exploration of the cinematic production of various nations (such as the US, Iran, Germany, France, Italy, Denmark, Russia), with focus on the aesthetic and ideological aspirations specific to them. For example: Prof. Joan Copjec, Iranian Cinema "Iran has emerged as one of the leading nations on the world political stage, at once mortal threat in its role as member of the "axis of evil" and (more in the past than recently) potentially pivotal ally in the destabilized Middle East. Since the 1990s, however, Iran has taken central stage in a different category: cinema. In the most prestigious international film festivals, Iranian films have consistently won many of the top prizes. This course will focus on Iranian cinema of the last two decades, but also some of the classics that served as their precursors. We will examine these films in as works of art emerging out of Iran's long and rich Persian culture and how they .intersect with the political events that have filled the news The issue of modesty and the system set up to enforce it will constitute one of the primary threads of our discussions. How does this system impact cinema? How is it thwarted or implemented in the films? Why do so many Iranian films seem to focus on divorce? And, most importantly, how do femininity, masculinity, desire, privacy, and the full range of human emotions fare under its regime? Finally: how do issues of sexuality become matters of State concern? What are the implications of State intervention in sexual affairs?"

ENG 383 Studies in World Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Courses in literature primarily from outside the United States and Britain. All texts in English or in English translation. A: Transnational Literature The study of literature from geographically and culturally diverse places that undermines the usual classification of literary texts in terms of national and regional literatures B: Literature in Translation Major texts in English translation, viewed in light of cultural and aesthetic cross-currents. C: Arab Literature Studies in literature by Arab writers in English translation, including focus on topics like Arab women writers, the Arab novel, and Palestinian literature. D: World Jewish Literature Study of Jewish writing, which has been written in all the languages Jews have spoken, including Yiddish, Ladino, Russian, German, Serbian, Hungarian, Polish, Hebrew, French, English, Portuguese, and Spanish. All literature taught in English translation. E: African Literature Studies in literature from Africa in English and English translation, including focus on topics like African women writers, the African novel, and African drama. For example: 383 A: Prof. C. Mardorossian, Transplantation, Displacement, and Identity This course focuses on narratives that emerged in response to a condition of exile, migrancy, and rootlessness that they paradoxically embrace and celebrate. The authors we will read emphasize the mixing of races, cultures, and languages across widely separate geographical and historical spaces. Throughout the semester, we will explore the alternative and regenerative forms of identity and self-understanding that are made possible by the experience of transplantation and displacement. Special attention will be paid to the ways in which writers depict their characters? relation to their urban, rural, and physical environment. We will try and determine whether there is such a thing as a ?migrant aesthetics? whose parameters we can identify in the fiction we read. We will read novels and short fiction by contemporary diaspora writers from India, Bangladesh, the Caribbean (Antigua, Cuba, Martinique), South Africa, England, and Iran. How do these works help us redefine the relationship between individuals and their environments? How do generational differences affect the literary production of these ?diaspora? communities? What happens to diasporic literature when it is produced by writers who have not experienced their parents? history of migration? What is the difference between ?diasporic,? ?migrant,? and ?exile? literature? For example 383B: Prof. W. Hakala, Afghanistan in the Traveler?s Eye Afghanistan has long attracted the attention of people from afar. From ancient quests for the ?Water of [Eternal] Life? to more recent expeditions seeking to exploit its vast underground mineral deposits, the ?Afghanistan? carried in the traveler?s imagination often conflicts with the Afghanistan that is actually encountered. This course is intended to serve not just as an introduction to the motivations and experiences of travelers to Afghanistan, but also to the forms of knowledge that are produced in the wake of such travels. For example 383H: H. Young, Contemporary African Literature This class will introduce students to a wide array of contemporary African literature. We will examine the legacy of colonialism and slavery, reading about how Africans have navigated the forces of global capital that still wrack the continent today. Moving away from stereotypes of Africans as primitive, we will examine complex cultural, linguistic and political histories that engender literary portraits of sophisticated peoples dealing with the vicissitudes of daily living. We will read, amongst other things about ghosts, prophets, child soldiers and bees.

ENG 385 Literature of the African Diaspora

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of the literary production of peoples of the African diaspora, examining transatlantic perspectives that enable comparison of black writers from places such as the Caribbean, England, and the United States. For example: Prof. H. Young, Contemporary African Literature This class will introduce students to a wide array of contemporary African literature. We will examine the legacy of colonialism and slavery, reading about how Africans have navigated the forces of global capital that still wrack the continent today. Moving away from stereotypes of Africans as primitive, we will examine complex cultural, linguistic and political histories that engender literary portraits of sophisticated peoples dealing with the vicissitudes of daily living. We will read, amongst other things about ghosts, prophets, child soldiers and bees. For example: H. Young, Terror in the African Diaspora This class samples black literature from all over the diaspora. Like a DJ mixing various elements of sound, we will learn a little from this place and a little from that place. Moving across genres as varied as science fiction and graphic mystery novels, we listen carefully to the sonic boom of rage, resistance and despair that echoes back and forth across the Atlantic. Ghosts, the mothers of murderers, and the children of slavery all speak their stories, asking us to walk a little of the way with them towards re-memory and perhaps, redemption.

ENG 386 Postcolonial Literature

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of the literatures of colonized or previously colonized peoples and their diasporas. For example: Prof. C. Mardorossian, Hybridized Writings This course will examine fiction as well as essays from a selection of countries with a history of colonialism (India, South Africa, Nigeria, Antigua, Haiti, Martinique, Canada) and we will analyze these texts in light of the important debates that have been preoccupying postcolonial studies (the field that studies literature and writings from and about colonized and ex-colonized countries). These debates gravitate around issues of cultural difference, agency and resistance, the politics of home and diaspora, globalization and the environment. Close attention will be paid to the different patterns of othering (human/animal, East/West, self/other, male/female) that these potential postcolonial narratives display, challenge, and sometimes unwittingly reproduce. Specifically we will analyze the intensively hybridized and transnational kinds of writings that have now achieved prominence in Western academic circles. We will examine the ways in which a diasporic and globalized consciousness has engendered new ways of thinking about literature?s relationship to the environment. How does an ecology-minded criticism impact our reading of literature? How does the ?greening? of our reading practices resonate in a context of environmental and global crisis? How do authors represent the challenges facing the environment and human/animal relations? Is the environment the wilderness? For example: Prof. C. Mardorossian, Violence and Trauma in Postcolonial Literature This course examine literary works, film, and essays produced either in countries that share a common history of colonialism or in contemporary immigrant communities. These texts will urge us to challenge concepts we may otherwise take for granted such as nation, language, race, gender, and national identity. We will focus on the ways in which these writings choose to represent the legacies of a past of violence, war, and trauma; what becomes of values like love, humanity, and equality in such contexts, the role language plays in carrying cultures and histories as well as issues of translation and translingualism in what is increasingly a global and interdependent world today. At a time when boundaries of space and nation are constantly crossed and re-crossed, what does it mean to have a culture? Can culture be dominated by other cultures? If so, how? The authors we will encounter in this course will urge us to take apart once cherished but static notions of home and identity and to replace them with a more historically grounded and critically attuned understanding of these ideas. They will take us on a journey that both disturbs and inspires, infusing old certainties with transformative insights and perspectives.

ENG 387 Women Writers

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of writing by women across a variety of periods and genres, with focus on the historical and cultural context of women?s lives. A: Twentieth-Century Women Writers Study of the writing of twentieth-century women, attending to its differences from and connections to earlier periods and mainstream traditions. May include a variety of genres. B: U.S. Women Writers Exploration of U.S. women?s writing as it participates in mainstream literary and rhetorical traditions and creates its own counter-traditions. May include women?s autobiographies, speeches, essays, letters, captivity and slave narratives, poetry, fiction and drama from a variety of periods. For example: Prof. J. Holstun, Socialism and Feminism In this course, we?ll talk about the twentieth-century American dialogue between socialism and feminism, with emphasis on the novel. For example: Prof. A. Lyon: American Women Activist Writers This is a course in political activisim, rhetoric, and human rights. We will look at bad girls and figure out how their language helps to create both the identity of women and changes it the larger society. To do this, we are going to read selections from almost three centuries of writings by American bad girls.

ENG 390 Creative Writing Poetry Workshop

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Pre-requisites: ENG 207 or permission of instructor
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Writing workshop in which students submit original writing for peer review and weekly critical responses and read advanced representations of the genre. Designed to help students develop their style, hone their technique, and produce original poetry For example: Prof. K. Mac Cormack The emphasis of this workshop-seminar course is the relationship of poetry to difficulty. What is the value of exploring poetry that is ?difficult", that does not yield an immediately transparent meaning or amalgam of emotions? Topics and contestations to be investigated include open versus closed form; the opaque text versus the transparent, and the variant sociologies of the reader function. Students are expected to actively engage with the various aspects of difficulty they encounter throughout the course and within their own and other students' work, and to regularly submit their writing to the workshop to review. For example: Prof. Myung Mi Kim This course offers a vital context in which you will be encouraged to generate new writing and new thinking about writing. Through a linked series of readings in contemporary American poetry and poetics as well as intensive writing exercises, you will be exploring your vision, deepening your sense of craft, and investigating writing as a process. This series of reading and writing experiments, along with your participation in attentive readings of each other's work, will embolden your sense of poetry's possibilities. Further, the University at Buffalo is widely acknowledged as one of the most exciting sites for the study of contemporary American poetry today, and this course will provide you with numerous chances to hear and meet with a diverse group of poets and scholars of poetry who will be visiting Buffalo during Fall, 2012.

ENG 391 Creative Writing Fiction Workshop

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Pre-requisites: ENG 207 or permission of instructor
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Writing workshop in which students submit original writing for peer review and weekly critical responses and read advanced representations of the genre. Designed to help students develop their style, hone their technique, and produce original fiction. What is the relationship of truth to fiction? How is reality created on the page? In what ways do fictional phenomena become credible in the stories in which they exist? How is the implausible made possible through fictional language? Under what conditions does a fiction support, resist, or transform the notion of ?story? by which it is often circumscribed? Students will explore the relation of fictional worlds to the words that create them through assigned exercises, workshop submissions, and discussions of selected readings. This class has several objectives: first, to teach you how to attend to the fundamental craft elements of fiction (such as plot, character, voice, setting); second, to present you with an array of readings and exercises that will assist you in designing specific, individualized approaches to you own work; and last, to give you multiple opportunities to contextualize and showcase your skills within short and long fictions. Students in this class will try their hand at a wide range of techniques?from the traditional to the avant -garde?so that you can begin to situate your work and poetics. We will study methods of revision and invention so that you also become skilled editors of your own work. Writing fiction is a discipline: this course aims to help you hone your knowledge of how fiction is made. For example: Prof. D. Anastapoulos The course emphasizes the development of each student's style and invention process, as well as the practical and technical concerns of a fiction writer's craft. Students will be asked to locate a context for their fictions by situating their work among a community of other fiction writers and to envision how their stories intersect with different schools of fiction. Each writer will be expected to conceive each story within the scope of a larger fiction project as well as to revise extensively in order to explore the full range of the story's narrative themes. The workshop will blend a craft-centered approach with discussions on the form and theory of fiction. We will spend the first third of the semester reading published fictions andcompleting exercises designed to develop your skills at writing complex forms of narrative. In the second half of the semester, we will engage one another?s work in a traditional workshop format: each week we?ll read two or three student manuscripts and critique them as a class; ideally, the student manuscripts will embrace the spirit, if not always the model, of assigned literature selections.

ENG 392 Literature, Writing, Practice

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Study of diverse writing that informs the contemporary literary scene and marketplace of poetry and fiction, designed for practicing writers. Course readings are selected to broaden students? understanding of the craft and history of poetry and fiction in order to improve the practice of their own work. For example: Prof. J. Goldman: Riddles, Riddling, and Reading This course will take the riddle, a curious, ancient literary form, as our point of departure for exploring a wide variety of cultural objects that ?riddle?: that is, works that ostentatiously offer themselves for reading, while simultaneously withholding what they mean. Under study will be riddles as well as New Testament parables, ancient tragedy, detective stories such as Sherlock Holmes and Melville?s ?Benito Cereno,? poems, paintings, perhaps a film. Rather than focus on unmasking the ultimate signifieds behind misleading ruses, we will investigate the repertoire of tactics engaged in the paradoxical task of revealing while concealing (and vice versa). For instance: How does the riddle, whose solution is often a most familiar object, estrange us from what we know? Riddling texts often seem less interested in their own answers than in using contrived murkiness to provoke reflection and to get at an Otherness in the mundane that becomes a socially disruptive and productive force. This spectacular opacity not only seduces us into reading closely, but also allows us to scrutinize our processes of interpretation, leading us to examine social relationships as characterized by degrees of knowing and knowingness, as inflected by power, control, belonging, and exclusion. For example: Prof. J. Goldman: The Poetics and Politics of Names and Naming This course will take up ?name? as it appears in conjectural histories of the origins of language with an eye towards deconstructing how these theory-fictions elaborate relations among words, the world, and the mind. We will look at philosophy, poetry, riddles, and nonsense literature that explores the vexed logical status of names. We will then turn to the proper name, focusing first on toponymy (place names) and cartography studies, interrogating mapping practices as charged political acts, particularly in colonial scenarios where naming is claiming (and attempted erasure of prior knowledges and names). Next we will turn to the disciplines of natural history and biology to examine species taxonomy, the networked naming of all biological organisms, focusing on Linnaeus? wild early versions of this system and on contemporary crises in taxonomy caused by species extinction. We will read Romantic and contemporary poets who think critically about taxonomy and put it to work. As we move on to examine anthropological work on kinship and names, we will read comedies of identity in which family structures and gender relations are destabilized and then re-rigidified through naming, study the dynamics of naming as it is framed as social action in speech act theory. The course will end with lines of thought in philosophy and poetry that postulate certain realms or entities as ineffable and there-fore short-circuit naming and name-ability altogether.

ENG 393 Writing Non-Fiction Prose

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Consideration and practice of style, rhetoric, form, and revision in a variety of genres. Focuses primarily on student writing but may consider a topic and require readings in non-fiction prose, for example, the essay. For example: Prof. S. Hubbard Creative non-fiction is the fastest growing genre of writing in the literary marketplace, finding its way into popular magazines, newspapers, literary journals, and book-length memoirs. It is a good genre to be working in if you hope to see yourself published. But beyond that pragmatic consideration, creative non-fiction is fascinating to read and challenging and satisfying to write. It can accommodate any number of topics, motives and styles. In this course, we will be trying our hand at writing one form of creative non-fiction, the essay (personal, familiar, cultural, lyrical). The essay is an ?essai??a trial, attempt, venture or experiment. It has no set form and no set subject. Its nature is to meander, reflecting the movement of the writer?s thoughts and the accidental associations of language. Creative essays can be funny, lyrical, disjunctive, philosophical, satirical, or quirkily informational (ruminating odd facts about the postal service, microscopic organisms or language itself). We will aim in this course for the broadest possible engagement with the possibilities of this protean form. Writing assignments will allow students to try out a variety of voices, modes, structures, and themes from essays of place, to portraits, collage essays, list essays, object essays, lyrical essays, familiar essays, and nature/science essays. For example: A. Stott Creative non-fiction is writing that uses many of the techniques of creative writing to create factual narratives. It differs from academic writing as it is often more personal, less scholarly, and is not required to conform to a predesigned rubric. It differs from fiction, because it?s true. Creative non-fiction takes many forms ? essay, memoir, longform journalism, biography, autobiography, history, sports writing ? but it in its best examples is always characterized by good writing, compelling narrative, and readability. This class will be taught as a writing workshop with in-class exercises, and group critiques of student work, as well as set readings chosen to represent good examples of its breadth and possibilities.

ENG 394 Writing Workshop

Tutorial
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Workshop in forms of writing about books and intellectual issues, with particular focus on non-academic writing such as book reviews, magazine editorials, and non-technical non-fiction prose. For example: J.K. Biehl: Writing for The Spectrum Love print and online journalism? Want to write and get your work published? Looking for a way to make your resume look fabulous? How about getting a chance to see the way UB really works-- and getting to talk to the important people on campus? (Not to mention working with cool students and making good friends.) The Spectrum, UB's student newspaper, needs students who are aggressive, self-motivated, and willing to meet deadlines on a weekly basis. As a writer for one of The Spectrum's desks (such as campus news, features, or sports), you'll be required to report and write at least twelve stories over the course of the semester that will be published in the paper.

ENG 395 Special Topics

Lecture
Credits: 1-3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. For example: Prof. R. Ablow: 19th Century British Women Writers When we think of nineteenth-century women writers, we often assume they led lives of propriety and self-restraint and wrote tales that reinforced the values of domesticity, orthodoxy, and docility. This course challenges that assumption by calling attention to another side of the nineteenth-century female writing tradition: one in which sexual desire, death, madness, and violence come to the fore. By reading a wide range of women writers, we will ask wat it meant to be a woman writer at a moment when the principla jobs open to women were as servant, prostitutes, governesses and wives? What kind of authority could be claimed bt women unable to vote, if married also unable to own property or bring lawsuits, and ordinarily deprived of anything but the most basic educations? How did women weigh in on the political, economic, and social issues that mattered to them most? And how did women rebel against as well as reinforce the values of their time.

ENG 397 Literary Journalism

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Workshop in forms of writing about books and intellectual issues, not specifically limited to the academic or scholarly community: book reviews, magazine editorials, nontechnical nonfiction. For example: Prof. M. Shechner This is a writing course, not a course about journalism. In it you learn the skills required to write critical/literary journalism on a high level, hopefully on a level that can allow you to publish widely and regularly. Thus it is ideal for students who envision journalism as a career or as an active supplement to an academic career. It takes ?composition? and your capacity for clarity and organization for granted and moves on to the next step: being interesting. The course will permit you to think about and work on matters of voice and style. A writer of any kind who wishes to make headway with his/her writing must have a voice, a distinctive signature that is his/hers alone. You?ll spend a lot of time learning how not to sound like a Brand X clone. We?ll spend a lot of time on resource building: where do words come from? Where do phrases come from? What is a sentence rhythm and how can I develop it? How do arguments really work? How many drafts of an essay or review do I have to write before it?s any good? For example: Prof. H. Wolf This course looks first at a collection of 20th century essays to get some idea of the range of subject matter and variety of expression possible within the field of what some now call the ?fourth genre? (creative non-fiction) and a few longer works. We then will look at some living examples of what we?re talking about ? current issues of some leading journals that we can buy off the rack ? The New Yorker, The Nation, etc. Then each student will be asked to write about one area of the arts or society as professionally as possible: books, travel, autobiography, movies, art, photography, etc. Some of this work will be duplicated and discussed by the class in general. By looking at what has been done in the field from 1900 to the present, and what is being written now, and by paying attention to what you are in the process of creating, we will have fulfilled our responsibilities.

ENG 398 Ethics in Journalism

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
For example: B. Andriatch Is it ever OK to break the law to get a story? When is it the right decision to publish a rumor? How do you know whether a picture that likely will offend readers and viewers should be used anyway? This course pushes students to examine how every action a journalist makes in gathering, organizing and presenting the news requires a value judgment. The course covers media credibility, steps in ethical decisionmaking, handling anonymous and unreliable sources, accuracy letters, conflict of interest and the difference between reporting and exploiting grief. The course uses the Society of Professional Journalists code of ethics as a model and guideline. Students study a range of historical scenarios, including Watergate, as well as hypothetical cases. They debate with the instructor and each other and participate in a panel that takes a position on an ethical conflict and defends it. Students read and discuss the decisions and mistakes of journalists who have come before them and analyze the dilemmas unfolding in newsrooms today.

ENG 399 Journalism

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. For example: J. K. Biehl, Features In this class, students will read, discuss and write (and rewrite) the kinds of lively, instructive feature stories that appear in the better newspapers, magazines and online publications. ?Features? is the grab-bag term for stories that are deeper and more human than hard news stories. They require more reporting, more nuance, more style. Done right, features can be the most moving and best-read parts of a newspaper or website. Students will learn advanced researching and writing techniques as they hone skills as reporters and thinkers. Students will study some of the best reporting and non-fiction literature produced in the past 100 years and dissect what makes each text remarkable. Readings will include some of journalism?s greatest profiles, sports stories, war correspondence and human interest stories. In class, students will dissect what makes each text great, how each could be better and why authors chose specific quotes, description and narrative structure. Students will apply these lessons to their own pieces. For example: C. Anzalone, Editing for the Conscientious Writer Behind every great book or article lies a great editor. This advanced writing course is intended for students who have demonstrated proficiency in basic college composition and who hopefully have some experience with the basics of journalism. The course will teach students both how to edit and improve other writers' drafts, and how to incorporate those good writing techniques into their own writing. We will become familiar with basic copyediting symbols, and learn how this shorthand can speed up basic editing communication and avoid common mistakes. Students will take turns writing stories and having their classmates edit their articles; they will alternate each role throughout the semester. All students will hopefully leave the class with extensive experience both in writing stories and editing their peers' work. So the editing techniques they learn will help them become better writers, as well as become the kind of editor the smartest writers crave to be a part of their writing process. Editing for the Conscientious Writer combines editing exercises, writing and reporting stories used for editing in class, and studying articles that illustrate memorable writing and editing. Editing for the Conscientious Writer will be an object lesson on how becoming a good editor makes you a better writer, and learning the skills of good writing enhances your ability to be a valuable editor.

ENG 400 Honors Seminar

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. For example: J. Conte: Postmodern Culture One of the ?cultural turns? of postmodernism is the intensifying shift from a print to a media graphics dominated culture. The prevalence of visual media has been the site of a debate regarding the relationship of complicity and/or critique of art and architecture in postmodernism. In support of the happy embrace of popular media in art and literature, the landscape designer and writer Charles Jencks, in Critical Modernism: where is post-modernism going? (2007), revises his argument that postmodern art and architecture have led the way since the demolition of the Pruitt-Igoe housing project in St. Louis in 1972 in adopting an eclectic style that combines popular and elite forms, mixed media, and cross-cultural references. Fredric Jameson, however, offers a more skeptical and Marxist reading of postmodernism, described as ?the cultural logic of late capitalism,? in which the contemporary arts are seen to have been at least partially compromised by their intimate relations with consumerism and multinational corporatism. Supplementing our reading of these and other cultural critics of postmodernism, we will be examining a variety of works of postmodern art and architecture that have become ?test cases? of what appeals to both populist and museum-going audiences. These works are either playfully ironic appropriations of popular culture; or they are coopted by the commercial and celebrity media they represent; or both. Interleaved with the art and criticism, we will read books that, in the waning days of print literature, make art and popular media the subject of sophisticated literary fictions. For example: Prof. Ming Qian Ma: Modern and Contemporary North American Poetry Designed as a survey class of modern and contemporary poetry in America, English 400 will begin with a brief review of poetry written in the traditions of Realism and Naturalism and then proceed by following a chronological approach that cover the period from the so-called High Modernism to the present, focusing on the major poetic movements such as Imagism, the Objectivist movement, the Fugitive Movement, the Confessional School, the New York School, the Harlem Renaissance, the Beat Movement, the Deep Image School, the Black Mountain School, the Language Poetry Movement, the New Formalism, and others.

ENG 401 Honors (Early Literature)

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Honors seminar on literature written before 1800. For example: J. Frakes, Western Epic Tradtion This course will examine the western epic tradition. Since epic is the genre that perhaps most vividly embodies a culture?s most essential values, 1) it is historically one of the foundational genres in a broad range of literary cultures, including our own; 2) it has given us some of the most thrilling tales of enduring importance in world literature, and 3) it is almost by definition a genre of unabashedly racist, misogynistic, elitist, and heterosexist narrative. While no culture ever identifies altogether with the values expressed in another culture?s epics, there is no question that epic is one of the most cross-culturally important and influential literary genres. For example: Prof. G. Hammill: 17th Century Literature This course is a survey of 17th century English poetry and prose, focusing primarily on the decades leading up to and including the English Civil Wars and Revolution, when writers grappled with new concepts of agency, emotion, action, and obligation. Between roughly 1620 and the 1670?s, new political theories began to conceive of individuals as autonomous agents endowed with natural rights and motivated by passion and self-interest, while writings on experimental science questioned the validity of abstract reasoning and probed the limitations of human imagination. How did writers of literature use these political and intellectual movements to shape literary culture? And how did writers shape literary culture in the interest of political innovation? Topics for discussion will include relations between self and society, the function of passion and imagination in the constitution and maintenance of community, and the role of love in the formation of social bonds, be it love as marriage, friendship, adultery, divine love, or self-love.

ENG 403 Topics in Medieval English Literature

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Various topics from Old English and Middle English literature.

ENG 404 Medieval Studies

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Various literary and cultural topics that cross national, linguistic, and cultural borders. For example: Prof. R. Schiff, Ecocriticism and Medieval Literature Western critical engagement with the environment too often privilege modernity, for example seeing the Romantic period as launching an era of Nature. Yet medieval literature is often deeply engaged with environmental issues, meditating on humans? immersion in a dynamic material world shared with animal, vegetable, and other entities. Our course will explore the poetics of nature in medieval romance, examining how landscapes and life-forms interact in the pre-modern Western imagination. We will explore the animalized worlds of otherworldly deer, voracious werewolves, and aestheticized birds.

ENG 405 Topics in Early Women Writers

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Texts written by women of various nationalities and periods in a variety of genres up to 1800. For example: Prof. R. Mack, 18th Century British Women Writers Do women and men think and feel differently? In this course we will look at the importance of this question for British women writers from the end of the seventeenth century through the end of the eighteenth century. We will be concerned in particular with the role of women writers in the emergence of the novel. In the mid-eighteenth century, women began for the first time to publish in significantly large numbers. But these women experienced both the possibilities and limitations of their new positions; they were often told that they could only write texts on certain subjects or novels with certain kinds of characters. In this course, we will concentrate on how these women writers, engaged in charting their new social roles, represent their female characters? thoughts and feelings, Specifically, we?ll ask how these writers deal with women?s usual consignment to the realm of feeling. Can the rational though so important for men?s roles in society also give heroines power, or must these fictional women obtain power of other kinds ? emotional or even economic? Are happy endings possible for intelligent heroines? Is there any alternative to an end in marriage?

ENG 406 Epic Literature

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of the social and cultural function of epic narrative; may include texts and/or film from a single time period or across the centuries. For example: Prof. J. Frakes, Early Medieval European Epic This course will investigate the social and aesthetic functions of epic early medieval European societies by means of historical and literary critical readings, but in particular by reading major portions of the Old English epic poem, Beowulf, in the original language. Appropriate secondary readings will be assigned, such that we can use the epic to come to an understanding of Anglo-Saxon culture and especially twenty-first century literary critical understandings of the epic.

ENG 407 Books of the Ancient Mayas

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
For the ancient Maya, books were instruments for seeing into distance times and places. The course will consider new deciphered hieroglyphic works, together with the works of Mayan writers who used the alphabet after the Spanish invasion. For example: Prof. D. Tedlock The ancient Maya painted inscriptions on pottery, modeled them in stucco, and carved them in stone. They also wrote on long sheets of paper, folded accordion-fashion to make books with jaguar-skin covers. These books were instruments for seeing; they made it possible for readers to recover the perfect sight that humans had enjoyed before the gods misted their vision. Readers could know what was far away, or what had happened in the past or was about to happen, whether in the divine realms of the sky and the underworld, or in the human realm on the surface of the earth. The temporal framework for these happenings was provided by a calendar that took account of the rhythms of the sun, moon, planets, stars, seasons, and human gestation. Women were among the writers. Four Mayan books survived in hieroglyphic form, having escaped the bonfires of the sixteenth-century missionaries. Other books survive because Mayans created alphabetically written versions (in their own languages) after the Spanish conquest and (in some places) continued to add new chapters as late as the nineteenth century. In addition, a great deal of ancient knowledge was and is transmitted orally, all the way down through the millions of speakers of Mayan languages who live in Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, and the United States. In the case of the ancient inscriptions and books, we will examine the results of recent breakthroughs in the decipherment of the Mayan script and even learn to read some hieroglyphs, picking up some basic knowledge of astronomy in the process. In the case of the alphabetically written books and contemporary oral sources, we will read English translations of narratives, prayers, speeches, chants, and songs, at the same time listening to what some of these forms sound like in the original language.

ENG 409 Topics in Shakespeare

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Selected topics in Shakespeare?s dramatic and non-dramatic work such as the social context of Shakespeare, gay and lesbian studies in Shakespeare, Shakespeare and national politics, Shakespeare and colonialism, Shakespearean adaptations, Shakespeare on film. For example: Prof. C. Mazzio: Forces of Nature: Shakespeare and the Environment This seminar will explore a range of Shakespeare?s plays in light of conceptions of nature and the natural world. In addition to focusing on close and careful analysis of the plays, this seminar will introduce students to new currents of scholarship on Shakespeare informed by eco-criticism, animal studies, science studies and the history of science. We will consider the relationship between bodies, psyches, and natural as well as built environments in Shakespeare as a means to understand dramas of knowledge and anxieties about error in new ways. In addition to working through ?forces of nature,? at once human and non-human, in selected plays, we will explore some early writing on the often frightening and crucially important status of nature and the environment as it related to regional identities, psychological dispositions, the status of science and technology, the experience of time and space, conditions of vulnerability and dependence, and conceptions of art, representation, and built environments. For example: Prof. B. Bono: Teaching Shakespeare This is a cross-listed upper-level undergraduate and graduate course in teaching Shakespeare. It is designed explicitly for students who imagine that they will be presented with the challenge and the pleasure of teaching our most prominent canonical author in junior high, high school, or college settings. Shakespeare's texts?in their linguistic density, their dramatic intensity, their cultural awareness, their communal impact?did important and controversial cultural work in their own day, and they can continue to do so now. In this course we will use some of the methods of the Folger Shakespeare Library's long-standing NEH-sponsored "Teaching Shakespeare Institute"?journal writing, wordplay, soliloquy analysis, adaptative and improvised scenarios, scene work, comparison of videos?coupled with the instructor's historical focus on the confluence of political and sex-gender issues, to remake and reinvigorate Shakespeare's texts for today's students.

ENG 410 Topics in Early Modern Literature

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Selected topics in early modern British literature such as the literature of exploration, science and literature, studies of specific genres or authors, classical antiquity and Humanism, reformation and religious controversy, gay and lesbian studies.

ENG 411 Topics in Milton

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Selected topics in the work of John Milton and his contemporaries such as the poetry of Civil War, radicals and revolutionaries, the aesthetics of court, religious controversy, pamphlet wars, Caroline visual culture, monarchy and absolutism.

ENG 414 Topics in Romanticism

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Selected topics in English, American, and/or European Romanticism such as the relation of the aesthetic to the political, the idea of the whole, the constitution of the self, the function of memory, the value of loss.

ENG 415 Topics in Victorian Literature and Culture

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Selected topics in British literature and culture such as the art and literature of the fin-de-siecle, Victorian sexualities, and the theory and practice of realism.

ENG 417 Topics in American Literature

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Selected topics in American literature, including attention to critical questions at the forefront of current criticism in American literature and American studies. For example: Prof. J. Conte: Literature of Immigration The path of immigration to the United States extends from the halls of Ellis Island to the globalized migration of the twenty-first century. First generation immigrants are often drawn to these shores by the blight of poverty or religious/political persecution; hope to make for themselves a fabled but often fictitious ?better life?: and are riven between the desire to retain old world customs and the appeal of new world comforts and technological advances. Second-generation immigrants face the duality of a national identity ? striving to become recognized as ?real Americans? ? and an ethnic heritage that they wish to honor and sustain but which marks them as always an ?other.? Then there are the natural-born American citizens. The third-generation descendent will have only indirect or acquired familiarity with his or her ethnic heritage: the loss of language and a multi-ethnic identity.

ENG 418 Topics in African American Literature and History

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. For example: Prof. J. Holstun: Slave Rebellions ?Slave narratives? usually means the stories of individual slaves or families as they suffer, survive, escape, and make reasoned and impassioned pleas for abolition. But enslaved black people throughout the Western hemisphere, and the white people who owned and feared them, also told themselves another sort of slave narrative?stories of armed black people joining together to kill their white owners and liberate themselves. This course is about black revolutionary struggle, white fear, and some moments of solidarity. We will study stories of revolts by slaves in cities, on ships, and on plantations, primarily in the United States, but also in the Caribbean and Latin America. And we?ll consider both literary questions (about genre, style, and point of view) and political questions about terrorism, the right to revolt, and the ethics and efficacy of armed resistance.

ENG 419 Topics in Latino/Latin American Literature

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Study of the relationship between literature and culture among Latinos in the U.S. as well as in Latin America. Central themes may include Latino cultural theory, hemispheric approaches, Latin American literature in translation, immigration and the borderlands, Latino re-workings of Latin American novels. Taught in English.

ENG 421 Topics in 19th Century Literature

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Close study of one aspect of eighteenth-century literature and culture.

ENG 422 Jane Austen

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Concentrated and detailed study of the works, biography, and milieu of Jane Austen.

ENG 425 Whitman and Dickinson

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Close study of these influential poets in relation to their lives, cultures, and audiences, with attention to gender, sexuality, and publication histories. For example: Prof. C. Miller These two great mid-nineteenth century American poets can seem like complete opposites in the style, manner, and focus of their poems. As this course will demonstrate, however, there are remarkable similarities between them and each is responsible for poetic innovations still influencing poets today. Similarly, each performs multiple forms of selfhood, resulting in very complex patterns of thought and representation. The shy hermit believes passionately in human community and writes extraordinary love poems; the most outrageous lover of all writes exquisitely of isolation and loneliness. Both Whitman and Dickinson participate enthusiastically in the popular culture and share many attitudes of their time, and both are singular and anomalous. During the semester, we will focus primarily on reading large numbers of poems in relation to performances of selfhood, nineteenth-century conventions of gender, sexuality, and race, the Civil War, the poets? vastly differing publication choices and histories. We will also spend time analyzing formal properties of the two very different kinds of verse, and talking about what it means to hear and speak (as well as read) these poems.

ENG 426 Mark Twain

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Concentrated and detailed study of the works, biography, and milieu of Mark Twain. For example: Prof. N. Schmitz Mark Twain, the performer, the comic lecturer, the stand-up comedian, is our first study in this course. This is the Bob Hope, Bill Cosby, Mel Brooks, Woody Allen, Mark Twain, media star, media magnate, a writer of comic sketches, a boaster at celebrity banquets and receptions, the Mark Twain who would have loved Hollywood and TV, loved lolling in the chair opposite Jon Stewart, bushy haired, wagging an unlit cigar. He originates the figure, America?s beloved humorist. If you know American cultural history, you know Will Rogers was the Mark Twain guy of the 20?s and 30?s. We?ll read a sequence of comic monologues, sketches, essays, speeches. We?ll sample some of his contemporary humorists: Artemus Ward, Petroleum V. Nasby, Josh Billings. We?ll consider the literary tradition of Southwestern humor (Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana) frontier humor, redneck humor. Next we turn to the great Mark Twain and his Civil War cycle, the one that begins with The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and ?A True Story,? that lovingly remember the antebellum South in ?Old Times on the Mississippi,? then loathes it in Life on the Mississippi, Clemens? desertion of the pro-Confederate Missouri National Guard in ?A Private History of a Campaign that Failed? and rethinks the desertion in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. We?ll regard the career in the 1880?s, the grate house on Farmington Avenue in Hartford, Connecticut, and realize the significance of its suburb, Nook Farm. His neighbor across the way is Harriet Beecher Stowe, her house as exemplary New England as Twain?s is Southern Baroque. And what do we do about the name ?Mark Twain??

ENG 427 William Faulkner

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Concentrated and detailed study of the works, biography, and milieu of William Faulkner. For example: Prof. N. Schmitz William Faulkner is the William Shakespeare of our national literature. He writes tragedies, comedies, tragicomedies, short fiction that might be said to be the equivalent of Shakespeare?s sonnets, and he is as profound and ironic as the first great Will. Oxford, Mississippi is a shrine not unlike Stratford, England. France gives Faulkner his gloire. Japan venerates Faulkner. Shouldn?t you have some knowledge what this is all about? Shouldn?t you have bright things t say about The Sound and the Fury and As I Lay Dying? Yoknapatawpha County is Faulkner?s personal post-Confederate South. You will learn its geography, its social history, its family histories. Shakespeare writes in and out of an England triumphant, empowered, everywhere boldly questing. Faulkner writes in and out of a defeated occupied post-Civil War American South. Actually the United States is just as triumphant in the middle of the 20th century as England was in the Renaissance, but that is never the story in Faulkner?s fiction.

ENG 429 James Joyce

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Concentrated study of James Joyce: the composition and reception of his works, their cultural and literary contexts, and the rise of Joyce studies. For example: Prof. D. Keane, Ulysses This course will function as an advanced-level introduction to James Joyce?s Ulysses. In the years since its initial appearance in Paris in 1922, the novel has both inspired and frustrated generations of readers and become the subject of a vast and fractious critical heritage, a legacy that can prove to be as daunting to even the experienced reader. That said, the novel is a very funny book, a movingly profound book, a ?good read.? What, then, about the book has created this circumstance, or made it available to be implicated in this circumstance? Our task over this semester will be to think through these related, if finally quite different, questions about the reception and institutionalization of Ulysses. For the first part of the semester, we will closely read the novel, attending to its formal challenges, the thorniness of its narrative details, and the background and context for its story of a single day in Dublin. In the second half of the semester, we will think about Ulysses as an institutional object by examining aspects of its composition and the subsequent textual and editorial issues thrown up by them; its dissemination through what have been called the ?institutions of modernism?; its checkered legal history in the U.S., where it was initially banned as obscene and then sparked an important court case that resulted in its legalization; and its eventual acceptance and canonization within the curricula of English departments. For example: Prof. D. Keane, The Practice of the Artist Over the span of the semester, we will follow how the figure of the artist and its function change during Joyce?s writing career ? in other words, how the vision of the artist within the texts (transubstantiator, fabulous artificer, low-rent manipulator hiding behind his own words) is affected by the practice of the artist who makes the texts. While we will pay necessary attention to the details of Joyce?s biography, this class will not be an exercise in biographical criticism or authorial hagiography. Rather, we will not only read closely selected portions from among all of Joyce?s works, including Finnegans Wake, but think about and discuss the literary, economic, social and historical forces that had profound impact on the conditions of aesthetic practice during his lifetime. In doing so, we will acquire a new vantage point on many of the most significant problems and issues subtending Joyce?s age and works: Irish struggles for political and cultural self-determination; exilic reinvention and cosmopolitan self-fashioning; class disparity and social attitudes; educational opportunity and access; the political and cultural influence of new forms of media; changing conceptions of gender roles and sexual politics; and debates about the place of art in modern society. At base, the course will track Joyce?s career-long investigation of the meaning of authority through his aesthetic practice.

ENG 431 Authors

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Concentrated and detailed study of the works, biography, and milieu of a single author, chosen by the instructor. For example: Prof. N. Schmitz, Ernest Hemingway In addition to Hemingway?s great works, this course will engage Hemingway?s relation to Gertrude Stein, see what she says about him in the Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, and what he says about her in A Moveable Feast. We might gaze upon some of her sentences written in the teens, note their swing, their simplicity, and see that same thing in early Hemingway. For example: N. Schmitz, Hemingway/Stein/Faulkner Triple trio, a concert of early modern masters of American literature, three writers, three works each. Ernest Hemingway: In Our Time, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and A Farewell to Arms. Gertrude Stein: Tender Buttons, Lifting Belly, The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, William Faulkner: Go Down, Moses (counts as three). Pam Laws, Floridian soul singer, gives us her angry version of the hymn Go Down, Moses. There is erotic merriment (the best of all joys) in Lifting Bellly and the best of all deaths in For Whom the Bell Tolls. From text to text we engage, we relish, three classical styles, each distinctive, each immitable.

ENG 434 Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Pre-requisites: ENG 390 or ENG 391
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Intensive poetry workshop in which students submit original work for review and revision and offer critical response to their peers. Geared to help students produce mature work with an aim toward future publication For example: Prof. Myung Mi Kim This course is designed as an intensive workshop seminar. Throughout the semester, we will experiment with new modes of writing poetry and promote a dialogue between acts of creation and acts of critical attention by responding to each other's work and through studying a wide range of poetry and poetics in a transhistorical frame. We will be listening for ways to extend the possibilities of the poem; we will pay close attention to issues of process, craft, and vision. Students can expect weekly generative exercises. Among the many, many possible arenas of investigation: What procedures, ?daily practices? do you have as a writer? How do you approach questions of form? How does your writing adapt, shift, or test the ?limits? of poetry? The invitation here, then, is for each of you to explore and expand your sense of poetry-- as creative act and as cultural intervention. For example: Prof. K. MacCormack This workshop/seminar course will focus on writing and the temporal, investigating the dynamics of poetry within appropriate historical contexts designed to frame and inform the students? own work. We will examine the poetry considered ?radical? within its own era and compare the techniques employed to create it. Texts to be considered include: the early 20th century attacks on grammar and the sentence by the Italian Futurist and Dada writers, Surrealist automatic writing, Chance Operations, the techniques resulting in Treated Texts, the radical poetics of the late 20th century and early 21st century, and translation as a creative strategy. (Antecedents from earlier centuries will be included for discussion.) Temporality as content will be considered, as well as what happens to temporality within a poetic text. How does time enter writing as both historical content and readerly experience? By exploring these varying dynamics the course will contextualize the multiple meanings of writing poetry at the beginning of the 21st century.

ENG 435 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Pre-requisites: ENG 391
Requisites: ENG 435
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Intensive fiction workshop in which students submit original work for review and revision and offer critical response to their peers. Geared to help students produce mature work with an aim toward future publication. For example: Prof. D. Anastasopoulos This advanced workshop is specifically designed to give students the opportunity to engage other students? work and to receive substantial feedback on their fictions-in-progress: to help students wrestle with, and refine, their craft. While the goal of this course is to help students produce two polished fictions, our workshop conversations will most frequently focus on how young writers can more carefully craft their prose by developing their ear for language. If, as Blanchot poses, fiction is ?impoverished? by nature, writers must carefully sediment with words the worlds they create in order to make their narratives seem ?real? to the reader. This course will encourage students to consider the nature of that ?authenticity?: how the writers? use of language helps produce, challenge, or resist the representations of the phenomena she creates. Novelist Paul West puts it another way: ?Don?t grapple with language. Let language grapple with phenomena.? For example: Prof. C. Milletti Novelist Paul West advises young writers: ?Don?t grapple with language. Let language grapple with phenomena.? This advanced workshop is specifically designed to give students the opportunity to engage other students? work and to receive substantial feedback on their fictions-in-progress: to help students wrestle with, and refine, their craft. While the goal of this course is to help students produce two polished fictions, our workshop conversations will most frequently focus on how young writers can more carefully craft their prose by developing their ear for language. If, as Blanchot poses, fiction is ?impoverished? by nature, writers must carefully sediment with words the worlds they create in order to make their narratives seem ?real? to the reader. This course will encourage students to consider the nature of that ?authenticity?: how the writers? use of language helps produce, challenge, or resist the representations of the phenomena she creates. As the advanced course in fiction writing within the creative writing curriculum, this course is designed to amplify your writing process, to develop your identity as a writer, and to begin to think about the publishing environment.

ENG 437 Advanced Writing Workshop

Tutorial
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Intensive practice in writing; specific approach chosen by instructor. Prerequisite 390, 391, or permission of instructor.

ENG 438 Film Directors

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Analysis of aspects of feature filmmaking based on study and discussion of classic films by great directors. For example: Prof. Bruce Jackson, The Buffalo Film Seminars This class is an experiment in looking at and talking about films. It?s a regular UB class, but the general public is welcome to attend. The two of us introduce each film, we screen it, we take a short break, and then we talk about the film with the students and anyone in the audience who wants to join us. The non-student part of the audience has been running over 200 people for each screening, about half of whom stay for the discussions. The Buffalo Film Seminars are grounded in two underlying assumptions. The first is that watching a good film on a television set is like reading a good novel in Cliff?s Notes or Classic Comics: you may get the contour of the story but not the experience of the work. Movies were meant to be seen big, in the company of other people. The second is that a conversation among people of various ages and experiences about a good movie they?ve all just seen can be interesting and useful. We try to pick films that will let us think and talk about genre, writing, narrative, editing, directing, acting, context, camera work, relation to sources. The only fixed requirement is that they have to be great films--no films of "academic" interest only. For example: Prof. D. Schmid, Hitchcock The aim of this class is to watch and discuss a representative sample of films from the long and distinguished career of the great director Alfred Hitchcock (1899-1980). You will learn why Hitchcock is considered to be one of the supreme masters of the film genre, what the major themes and concerns of his work are, and how to approach and analyze a Hitchcock film. Along the way, we will discuss such subjects as auteur theory, film history, and cinematic technique. Throughout the class, we will emphasize how Hitchcock himself and his films have come to embody the possibilities of cinema.

ENG 440 Film Theory

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Various systematic approaches to the study of film and the work of important authors of classical and contemporary film theory such as Andre Bazin, Bela Balazs, Stanley Cavell, Michel Chion, Gilles Deleuze, Mary Ann Doane, Sergei Eisenstein, Jean Epstein, Sigfried Kracauer, Jacques Lacan, Laura Mulvey, Pier Paolo Pasolini, and Slavoj Zizek. For example: Prof. J. Copjec: Hitchcock and Film Theory Hitchcock is one of the most famous auteurs (authors) in the history of cinema. Most of you are able to recognize him from the few lines of a caricature drawing in profile and know him immediately by his sobriquet, ?the master of suspense.? But what is meant by this nickname, exactly; what is Hitchcockian about the suspense that builds up in this master?s films? And what is an auteur? By what identifying marks can we recognize a Hitchcock film? One of the most compelling features of his films is their simultaneous operation on two different levels, which are linked in individual films by a distinctive form or shape. The level of the film?s narrative is doubled by a meta-cinematic level where Hitchcock explores the nature of cinema itself and the very act of looking at it. This meta-cinematic dimension of his work has made Hitchcock the darling of philosophers who like to ask questions about cinema. We will read several philosophically-inclined interpreters of Hitchcock as we attempt to understand what he has to teach us about the movement and temporality of images, the various kinds of cinematic space, the function of the close-up, the kinds of relations that obtain between sounds and images. We will pay special attention to what motivates the fascination of his characters, the pattern of their interlacing looks and their various deflections. We will also try to discover what the difference is (if, indeed, there is a difference) between the characters? (very often) perverted curiosity and the curiosity we ourselves engage in as spectators of his films.

ENG 441 Contemporary Cinema

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of contemporary cinema, potentially including popular film, film from various cultures and sub-cultures, and topics in film theory. For example: Prof. R. Roussel, Contemporary Asian Filmmakers This course will look intensively at the work of several Asian filmmakers including Hirokazu Koreeda (Japan), Anh Hung Tran (Vietnam), Zang Ke Jia (China) and Hsiao-hsien Hou. I am interested in the way these directors have adopted certain elements of documentary to narrative film but I wouldn?t call this the ?theme? of this course in any narrow sense.

Laboratory
Credits: 1
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of contemporary cinema, potentially including popular film, film from various cultures and sub-cultures, and topics in film theory.

ENG 442 Modernism and Film

Lecture
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Focused study of the interrelations of modernist literature and innovative and popular film during the early twentieth century.

Laboratory
Credits: 1
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Focused study of the interrelations of modernist literature and innovative and popular film during the early twentieth century.

ENG 446 Topics in World Literature

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Advanced study of literature written primarily outside the U.S. and British Isles. Literature taught in translation. For example: Prof. W. Hakala: Islam and South Asian Literature The purpose of this course is to expose students to the wide variety of poetic and prose literary forms associated with Islam in South Asia, incorporating examples in English translation from Arabic, Hindi, Pashto, Persian, Tamil, and Urdu originals. Instead of presenting materials chronologically, students will explore literature synchronically through a variety of themes and genres common to the literary tradition of various South Asian languages. As such, the course is organized into five sections: 1) Theoretical foundations; 2) Formal Poetry; 3) Narrative Poetic Forms; 4) Prose; 5)Literary History. Students are expected to demonstrate familiarity with the content of readings and evaluate the efficacy of the various approaches through which literature has been analyzed. All of the texts are in English and no background in South Asian languages or literature is expected.

ENG 447 Literature of Migration

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of literatures from various diasporas that highlight the effects of straddling different cultural worlds.

ENG 454 Literature and Philosophy

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Application of that reading skills acquired through the study of literature to philosophical texts with the goal of understanding the production of philosophical knowledge and questions of rhetoric, language, staging, genre, reading and writing. For example: Prof. S. Miller: Death and the Limits of Representation This course will explore the relationship between philosophy and literature through their common concern with the representation of death. We will consider how the problem of death factors into philosophical discussions of ethics and politics, science and religion as well as the representation of authority in drama, the representation of self in lyric poetry, and the representation of love and childhood in the novel.

ENG 455 Cultural Theory

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Examination of such topics as popular culture, practices of everyday life, theories of sacrifice, group psychology, institutions and counter-institutions, ritual, commodity aesthetics, criminology, urbanism, television, fashion, and cuisine. For example: Prof. D. Alff: Highways, Sewers, Ports: Building Modern Britain 1660-1820 This course asks what some of eighteenth-century Britain's most fascinating novelists, poets, and dramatists had to say about the urgent infrastructural problems of their day, from the contamination of drinking water to the flammability of cities to the navigability of waterways. By investigating the writings of Bunyan, Defoe, Johnson, Austen and others for themes of urban planning, transportation, sanitation, and land-use policy, this course considers the role of public works (literary texts and construction projects) in the development of British literary imaginations. At stake in our inquiries will be an understanding of the conditions under which publics commissioned various forms of work during the eighteenth century, and how works came to constitute recognizable publics.

ENG 456 Theories of Narrative

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Examination of key terms in the study of narrative (story, discourse, plot, author, reader/audience, ideology) through examination of work of by theorists such as Propp, Barthes, Bakhtin, and Todorov.

ENG 461 Topics in the Novel

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Study of the formal structures, history, and impact of the novel form.

ENG 462 Topics in Poetry

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Pre-requisites: ENG 461 Or TH 485
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Exploration of topics relevant to study of various genres of poetry; may include questions of historical development, innovations in form, or focus on particular genres and features, including the ballad, narrative verse, lyric, poetry and song, conceptions of voice, prose-poetry, or the collage poem.

ENG 464 Comedy

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Theories of comedy and humor such as those by Freud, Bergson and Zupani, with examples of comic texts from Aristophanes to the present.

ENG 470 Special Topics

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. For example: Prof. J. Valente: Irish Literature Revival: The Irish Art of Scandal This class focuses on Irish novels from the 1980?s to the present day as literary responses, in real time, to the slowly unfolding and deepening child abuse scandal, both disciplinary and sexual, in Ireland. We will look at how these novels represent the war on children conducted in Ireland?s Catholic orphanages, Magdalen laundries, industrial schools and church sacristies. That is to say, we will interpret the novels as modes of social intervention in a problem involving both violence and secrecy. But we will also seek to determine what is distinctively literary in these interventions, what difference it makes that these are in fact fictional narratives with aspirations to aesthetic value. In a larger sense we will be pondering the social vocation of literary art, the specific means and consequences of literature?s reaction to social and moral crises. For example: Rhonda Reid: Tutoring/Teaching Composing/Writing Do you want to teach? Tutor in the Writing Center? Learn about writing in the professions and the workplace? Improve your writing? English 470 introduces students to theories of writing and focuses on improving writing through one-on-one conferencing. Students who have completed the course are eligible to apply as peer tutors in the Center for Writing Excellence. The course should: introduce composition theories and learning theories; improve writing abilities through reading, practice, conferences, and reflection; help develop oral communication for effective one-on-one interaction as well as group discussion and presentations; develop tutoring skills and strategies to work with writers from diverse backgrounds, including other disciplines; expand knowledge of ways to use technology to communicate effectively; enhance research strategies and skills; and develop leadership abilities.

ENG 480 Creative Writing Capstone

Seminar
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Pre-requisites: ENG 390 or ENG 391
Requisites: ENG 480
Grading: Graded (A-F)

ENG 496 Writing Internship

Tutorial
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable.

ENG 497 Honors Thesis

Tutorial
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable.

ENG 498 Undergraduate Research Assistance

Tutorial
Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Work with faculty mentor on research or creative project.

ENG 499 Independent Study

Tutorial
Credits: 1-6
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable. Guided reading and directed research under individual faculty advisors.

Updated: 15 Sep 2014 06:03:39 EDT